Volunteers Needed: StoryStudio Chicago Writers Festival

StoryStudio Chicago is looking for volunteers to help with their conference on October 5th and 6th!

It is StoryStudio’s 2nd annual Writers Festival hosted by Columbia College Chicago. Curated by Artistic Director Rebecca Makkai, the two-day Festival features an amazing line-up of authors led by Keynote Speaker Garth Greenwell. Both graduate and undergraduate students are welcome to volunteer time in exchange for free conference attendance around their shifts. 

The conference link is here: https://www.storystudiochicago.com/storystudio-writers-festival/

Interested students can contact StoryStudio here: https://www.storystudiochicago.com/contact-us/

Open Door Series: Kathleen Rooney, DePaul alum Andrea Rehani

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The Open Door series presents work from Chicago’s new and emerging poets and highlights the area’s outstanding writing programs. Each hour-long event features readings by two Chicagoland writing program instructors and two of their current or recent students. November’s Open Door Reading presents Chicago State University’s Kelly Norman Ellis and her student April Gibson along with DePaul University’s Kathleen Rooney and her student Andrea Rehani.

Tuesday, November 21st at 7:00 PM
The Poetry Foundation
61 W. Superior

Learn more!

Chasing Wilder in Chicago: Thornton Wilder’s The Eighth Day

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The Wilder Family and The Newberry Library present “Chasing Wilder in Chicago: Thornton Wilder’s The Eighth Day” on

Wednesday, November 15 at 5 PM
Ruggles Hall at the Newberry Library
60 W Walton St, Chicago, IL 60610

This 50th anniversary celebration of Wilder’s National Book Award-winning, Chicago-based novel will feature a conversation with Thornton Wilder’s nephew and literary executor Tappan Wilder, Jeremy McCarter and Liesl Olson; readings from the novel by professional Chicago-area actors; and cake!  The event starts at 5pm with a reception and it’s all free and open to the public. Reservations are recommended.

Learn more!

Lit & Luz Festival 2017

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~Get Your Tickets Now for this One-time-only Event!~

BELONGING: A LIVE MAGAZINE SHOW EXTRAVAGANZA

Saturday, October 21st

Co-Prosperity Sphere, 3219 S. Morgan St.

Get your tickets.

View a complete listing of events.

What is a Live Magazine Show Extravaganza?

The Live Show caps the Lit & Luz Festival, which kicks off on October 17th. Participating writers and artists from Mexico City and Chicago work as teams to create a 10-minute-or-less collaborations. Past presentations have included the birth of a rock band, new poetry translations, typewriter epistles via video, inter-city photo essays, and comedic monologues. What will 2017 and the theme, “Belonging, “ have in store? Find out at this exclusive event that moves between Spanish and English, live lit and image, and caps Lit & Luz 2017.

Ticket sales and donations support the Lit & Luz Festival, which presents more than a dozen free events featuring Mexican and Chicago writers and artists in neighborhoods across the city. The festival is produced by MAKE Literary Productions, a 501c3 nonprofit, in partnership with universities, arts organizations, local businesses, and foundations. It is made possible in large part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

What is a Letter? History of the Book Lecture Series

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Join visiting professor Peter Stallybrass and the History of the Book Program for a presentation and reception on

Thursday, October 12, 2017
Lecture 6 pm; Reception 7 pm
Ruggles Hall
Newberry Library
60 West Walton Street

Free and open to the public

Peter Stallybrass begins with a very simple proposition, although he hopes that it will have some surprising implications. The proposition is that the vast majority of letters written between the 1530s and the 1920s consist mainly of blank paper—and that they are designed to do so. This will seem particularly surprising to those of us who have repeatedly emphasized the cost of rag paper, which was often the single most expensive item in the production of the great majority of printed books before the introduction of wood pulp paper in the later nineteenth century.

To put his proposition at its bluntest, letters throughout Europe and America for about four centuries were designed to waste as much paper as possible. Why? Because the more paper you waste, the shorter the letter you have to write. His argument is that letters, despite the endless rhetoric about the significance of long letters, usually aspired to be telegrams, postcards, or emails.

A reception will follow the program.

Learn more and register online.