Course Spotlight: American Literature 1865-1920

ENG362_AmericanLiterature

This class covers American fiction written during the latter half of the nineteenth century and the first years of the twentieth century, roughly the period spanning from after the Civil War up through World War I. Scholars of this period have long noted a rapidly expanding yet increasingly diverse nation that arose from advances in industrialization, urbanization and immigration. This course examines the artistic strategies (realism, naturalism, the stirrings of modernism) by which writers of fiction represented a growing multiplicity of points of view among different communities as well as the tensions that arose from competing needs and desires. Writers studied include Edith Wharton, Henry James, Mark Twain, W.E.B. Du Bois, Kate Chopin, Zitkala-Sa, and Theodore Dreiser. MW 11:20-12:50

Course Spotlight: Covering Latino Communities

Covering Latino Communities

If you still are looking for a Winter term class, consider Prof. Escalona’s Covering Latino Communities. The class is an amazing opportunity to learn about Latinx in the media from a journalism perspective, but you do not have to be a journalism major to take it. It is also an excellent opportunity to improve your writing, build your portfolio and network with the amazing professional speakers that will visit the class.

Class meets Thursday nights 5:45 p.m.- 9:00 p.m. in the Daley Building (14 E Jackson).

Please contact Prof. De Moya (director of the Latino Media and Communication program) at mdemoyat@depaul.edu  if you have any questions.

Course Spotlight: Science & Nature Writing

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Science and Nature writing is an immersion in the fun of writing about the natural world with the art of the novelist. We meet scientists and hear from guest professionals, reading works covering the inner and outer realms of the mind and body. It’s a great course for well-paying jobs with travel, every bit as creative as fiction and poetry. Absolutely no prior science background is necessary. If you liked Cosmos, The Jinx or Serial, this is a little-known writing field looking for you.
MW 2:40-4:10

Course Spotlight: Shakespeare & Rome

ENG328_Shakespeare and Rome

This course fulfills the Research-Intensive requirement for English majors.

A study of Shakespeare’s career-long engagement with Roman literature, mythology, and history. As a research-intensive course, we will use both primary source archives and recent criticism to consider Rome as not only a source for Shakespeare’s poetic and dramatic writing, but also a unique experiment in defining the success of English literature at the turn of the seventeenth century. Activities include visits to Special
Collections, curating a digital exhibit of images from books that are more than four centuries old, analyzing the film history of Shakespeare’s Rome, and a group-oriented approach to research methods.

MW 2:40-4:10