Featured Visiting Writing Series Event on September 30th

Visiting Writers’ Event this Wednesday!

In partnership with the History Department, The English Department Visiting Writers Series is hosting a remote event for the release of Professor Kathleen Rooney and Professor Miles Harvey’s books beginning at 6:00 pm on September 30: Historical Research in Fiction and Creative Nonfiction: Readings and Conversation with Kathleen Rooney and Miles Harvey. The conversation will be moderated by Amy Tyson of the History Department. 

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Michele Morano New Release & Events

Congratulations to Michele Morano for her newest book, Like Love! The memoir-in-essays explores the idea of unconsummated romance and all of its possible lessons, pleasures, and weirdness. 

While the book comes out Friday, September 25th, 2020, here are some events as a part of Morano’s virtual book tour:

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Currently Active Publications for Undergraduate Submissions

Here you’ll find an updated list of magazines, blogs, journals, etc. where undergraduate students can submit their work. Find out more at the links below (listed in alphabetical order)

The Allegheny Review — A nationwide literary magazine that annually publishes undergraduate poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, and artwork.

Columbia Poetry Review — a student-edited, national literary journal published annually by Columbia College.

Crook and Folly — This is DePaul’s very own award-winning journal of literature and art. The journal is run by students and accepts submissions of poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, flash fiction, and dramatic lit.

North Dakota Quarterly — A literary and public humanities journal that has published a mixture of articles, essays, fiction, and poetry for over 100 years.

Rainy Day — Cornell University’s literary magazine. They accept fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, and short plays from college undergraduate students.

The Foundationalist — An intercollegiate literary journal organized by undergraduate editorial boards at Yale University, Bowdoin College, and University of Iowa that publishes undergraduate pieces of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and essays.

The Orange Couch — A literary magazine created and run by tutors at the UCWbL for DePaul writers and alumni.

30 N — A fine arts undergraduate literary review published by North Central College.

Be sure to check back on an updated list.

Release Recap

In case you missed it, we’re celebrating three new releases from the English department faculty! Find out more about the authors and their most recent publications below (listed in alphabetical order by author’s last name).

Miles HarveyThe King of Confidence

Kathleen RooneyCher Ami and Major Whittlesey

Eric SelingerThe Routledge Research Companion to Popular Romance Fiction

Deadline Extended: Study Abroad in London and Dublin

The London and Dublin: Travel, Heritage, and History program during December Intersession examines the heritage, public history and travel narratives of both cities. These two cities are irrevocably entwined historically, in material culture and in public memory. This continued connection can still be seen today in the difficulty of constructing BREXIT and the ongoing connections between the UK and Ireland.

The deadline has been extended to June 15, 2020. Apply on the Study Abroad application portal here.

 

HIST 269/398: Intro to Public History Name

ENG 272/379: Travel Literature and the Construction of Meaning

The two separate courses share a common focus on understanding how individuals interpret their encounters with the other and the past. In particular, we will address the nature of heritage in the context of class and colonization. The History course looks specifically at how the past is remembered in public venues like museums and historic sites, and how history museums shape how we understand past. The travel writer consumes these interpretations of the public space and provide a window into how individuals and societies have constructed meanings and images of themselves and others through cultural contact with the past meanings of place and personal identities. London and Dublin are ideal sites for interrogating these issues.

 

See attached flyer for details.