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Keats-Shelley Prize 2021: Deadline TODAY, April 12th

Poets are asked to write on the 2021 theme of ‘Writ in Water’. No more than 30 lines and must fit onto a single A4 page. 

Essays may be on any aspect of the writing and/or lives of the Romantics and their circles, and should be written in a clear and accessible style. No more than 3,000 words. 

Submit in Microsoft Word format. 

Find out more and submit here TODAY!

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DePaul Alum Book Review! At the End of the World, Turn Left by Zhanna Slor

A DePaul MAWP alum wrote a book! And it comes out this month! Wow, we are so thrilled to celebrate Zhanna Slor and her debut novel, At the End of the World, Turn Left

If you missed our alum profile of Zhanna, be sure to check it out here

After I (hello, English Grad Assistant speaking) sat down over Zoom with Zhanna, she graciously sent me an ARC of her book. DePaul biases aside, I was hooked from the very first scene and its engagingly raw writing. Well, really, I knew I would like it after listening to the book’s playlist (linked on her website). When I sat down to read, and read and read some more, the following chapters affirmed my prediction. 

The novel follows Maria (Masha) Pavlova as she returns to Milwaukee at her father’s request when her sister, Anastasia (Anna), goes missing in 2008. The book covers their family’s various experiences as Jewish Russian immigrants coming from 1980s Soviet Ukraine, and when we meet Masha, she’s returning to the U.S. after finding a home in Israel’s Orthodox community in her early twenties. While Masha searches for Anna, now 19 years old, readers see the sisters’ stories unfold in the past and present as they both search for their identities—what does it mean to begin childhood in the USSR and then live in the U.S. as growing adult women? We see their relationship with Riverwest—their adolescent home of vibrant color, grit, and drugs. As both Masha and Anna find themselves away from home, they learn about who they are as immigrants, daughters, Jews, sisters, Americans, Ukrainians, and women. We see them wrestle with a tension of knowing how much their parents had to sacrifice for them, feel the pressure to make it all worth it. While each family member is connected to each other, they each have their own cultural and home experiences, lending itself to gaps of understanding between generations that are explored throughout the novel. We see how each navigates the tension of then and now, of who they are, who they were hoped to be. and their connections to their homelands. 

This literary mystery/thriller is captivating from the beginning with an intriguing plot and question over Anna’s disappearance, but I also kept reading for the characters themselves and their relationships with each other, themselves, with leaving, and with all the places of home. I’m truly grateful for the chance to read a story that gives insight into another multifaceted experience of what it means to go missing and come back. 

At the End of the World, Turn Left is released on April 20th, and you can preorder & order through Barnes & NobleIndie BoundIndigo, or Amazon.

Professor Michele Morano will be joining Zhanna on April 23rd for a virtual conversation. Click here for more information about the event and registration. 

Follow her on social media here: 

Goodreads

Instagram

Twitter

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Upcoming Event & Interview

The upcoming event with writer and New York Times contributor Salamishah Tillet will be on April 14th, 6:00-7:00 p.m. You can read more about the event here.

The event is co-sponsored by the DePaul Department of English, Women’s Center, Center for Black Diaspora, and African and Black Diaspora Studies

Make sure you register for the event and check out this recent interview with Tillet and Elle Magazine.

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Celebrating Poetry East’s 100th Issue & 40th Anniversary

Founded in 1980, the internationally acclaimed literary magazine Poetry East is celebrating National Poetry Month in April with two milestones—its 40th anniversary and its 100th issue. Poetry East has been edited from the start by the noted poet and DePaul professor Richard Jones, who reminds us that poetry should be accessible to anyone who reads it and is enthralled with language and ideas. 

Coming up on April 26 at 6pm is a public celebration of the Poetry East double anniversary—40 years of operation and 100 issues—sponsored by the Chicago Public Library:

https://chipublib.bibliocommons.com/events/6054f355b635ed4500a2cab6

Jones will be in conversation with Miles Harvey, director of the DePaul Publishing Institute and author of The King of Confidence.

Newsline recently featured a piece on the fortieth anniversary of Poetry East, a wonderful tribute to Richard’s hard work in creating and maintaining this preeminent literary journal. 

Learn more about the journal online​ and order your copy.

Seeking submissions! Undergraduate Research Journal: Creating Knowledge

The English department is now seeking submissions for the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences’ undergraduate research journal, Creating Knowledge.

Faculty members from the English department will choose one essay to represent the department in this year’s publication. If you would like to have your essay considered for publication, please email a copy of your paper as a Word document to Professor Rebecca Cameron at rcameron@depaul.edu by 5 pm on Friday, April 23rd

Congratulations to Professor Megan Heffernan!

DePaul’s English Department extends a warm congratulations to our very own Megan Heffernan on the publication of her book Making the Miscellany: Poetry, Print, and the History of the Book in Early Modern England.

Today marks one month since the book was released! Check it out here

Next month, Megan will be joining authors Laura Kolbys and Claire M. L. Bourne for a virtual celebration on May 14th at 10:00 a.m. Register here. This event is before the English Spring Conference, which will be recognizing student writing. 

Congratulations!

Upcoming Event! In Search of the Color Purple by Salamishah Tillet

Alice Walker made history in 1982 when she became the first black woman to win the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award for ​The Color Purple​. Almost forty years before the “Me Too” movement, the book received both praise and negative criticism upon publication and for the conversations around race, gender, and sexual violence that it sparked and still continues today. Since then, the powerful and controversial novel has been adapted into an Oscar-nominated film directed by Steven Spielberg and a Broadway musical produced by Oprah Winfrey.

In Search of the Color Purple​ by prominent academic and activist ​Salamishah Tillet​ combines cultural criticism, history, and memoir to explore Walker’s epistolary novel. Tillet examines the groundbreaking novel through archival research, interviews with Alice Walker, Oprah Winfrey, Quincy Jones, and others, and through her own personal experiences with the text. Reading ​The Color Purple​ at age fifteen was a groundbreaking experience for Tillet that continues to resonate—as a sexual violence survivor, as a teacher of the novel, and as an accomplished writer. Provocative and personal, ​In Search of the Color Purple​ is a bold and timely work from an important public intellectual that captures this novel’s seminal role in reimagining trauma, healing, and justice for generations to come.

The event will be on April 14th, 6:00-7:00 p.m. and is co-sponsored by the DePaul Department of English, Women’s Center, Center for Black Diaspora, and African and Black Diaspora Studies

Register for the event here