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Call for Submission: Equatorial is Asking for Undergrad Poets!

Equatorial is a new publication curating international voices in undergraduate poetry. Submissions are open through November 30. Follow this link for guidelines and info!

Aiming to encourage the spread of enriching craft, Equatorial is a literary magazine that publishes inspiring works of poetry by remarkable undergraduate talents. Our intention is to allow the individual freedom to traverse through the depths of the intangible or mappings of the physical. We encourage artists to explore the realities of the world, culture, and global affairs, or dive into the unfathomable climate of human imagination and innovation. A place where ideas are constructed or deconstructed, diverging or converging, Equatorial is for readers wishing to roam new worlds. 

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Call For Submissions: Collision Literary Magazine

Collision Literary Magazine at the University of Pittsburgh is currently open for submissions- deadline February 24. Your submission will be considered for writing and cover art contests. You can find more information about the magazine and our submission guidelines at https://www.collision.pitt.edu.

Founded in 2001, Collision Literary Magazine publishes undergraduate writing and art from all over the world. Collision accepts fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, and art, with a particular interest in experimental work that challenges style and structure. It is a student-run publication housed under the English Department at the University of Pittsburgh.

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Call For Submission: Prairie Margins

Bowling Green State University’s undergraduate literary magazine, Prairie Margins is now accepting submissions in fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction and visual art! This storied publication, founded in 1963, only accepts previously unpublished work, only from undergraduate students for its annual print issue. Submissions for their 2022-2023 edition are now open! Follow this to their submittable page for guidelines and to send in your stuff! Check out their website at https://prairiemargins.com/ for more about the magazine’s history, their archives and the quality of work they publish.

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Check For Updated Course Listings Under Winter 2023:

A few edits to course listings and descriptions were made due to my own oversight. Make sure to look into the newly listed courses in Comparative Literature:


ENG 389/ Russian Short Story/ In Person/ Liza Ginzburg
The study of a representative selection of Russian short fiction
concentrating on the great 19th-century masters such as Pushkin,
Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Gorky, and Korolenko.
M/W
4:20-5:50

&


ENG 389/ Japanese Women’s Literary Masterpieces/ In Person/ Heather Bowen-Struyk
The course begins over 1000 years ago with masterpieces of world
literature including The Tale of Genii and classical poetry, traverses
through the modern period of New Women Bluestocking and arrive
in the 21st century to reflect on the richness of Japanese women’s
writings across time and space. * No prior knowledge of Japanese
language, history or culture necessary.
M/W
2:40-4:10


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Grant Opportunity:

College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences Dear Full-Time Faculty in LAS, I am writing to invite applications to the Undergraduate Research Assistance Program (URAP) for Winter and Spring Quarters of 2023. The URAP is a faculty grant that will pay an undergraduate student of your choice to serve as a research assistant on your project for up to two quarters. The student receives remuneration for their time; the faculty member receives the student’s paid support. The URAP is open to both term and tenure-line faculty members. Information about the URAP, and a link to the application portal, is available at the LAS Internal Grants Page. The application portal will open tomorrow, October 1; the firm application deadline is October 31, 2022.    Both the faculty member and student complete applications, so you’re encouraged to explore the guidelines and forms, and have conversations with prospective student co-applicants early in the application period.   For any needed assistance with the application submission, please email Erica Godfrey in the LAS dean’s office. Peter Vandenberg, Ph.D.
Executive Associate Dean
College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
990 West Fullerton Avenue, Chicago, IL 60614-2458
Phone: 773/325-1795
pvandenb@depaul.edu
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My Interview With Professor Kathleen Rooney and Her New Book, Where Are The Snows: See Her Read Tonight, Oct.19, 6-7 PM in ALH 103!

I recently had the opportunity to ask (via email) author, poet and Professor Kathleen Rooney about her newest poetry collection, Where Are The Snows. Along with the award winning book’s vital take on a world insistent on ending, we get to talking about the collection’s relation to Rose Metal Press and Poems While You Wait, and finding poetry in unexpected places. Make sure to catch Professor Rooney along with Professor Tara Betts tonight, October 19, 6-7 PM in ALH 103 for a reading and book signing!

Thanks again for talking with me about Where Are the Snows. And congratulations on winning the 2021 X.J. Kennedy Prize! I was really taken aback by this collection. It felt very much like a living record of this moment in time, even when dealing with subjects that extend far beyond right now. Did the events of the last couple of years spur this collection, or did all of this catastrophe just coincide with your regular writing practice?

KR: Thank you so much and I’m happy to hear you found the book striking. All of the poems in the collection were written during late March and April of 2020. That kind of concentrated daily activity is not always a part of my writing practice. But my dear friend and fellow poet Kimberly Southwick put together a National Poetry Month poem-a-day group then as she often does, and I had signed up to participate. When I agreed to do the challenge (30 poems in 30 days!) I had no idea that April of 2020 would be a nadir of pandemic panic and despair, but it was.

Consequently, the poems, as you observe, distill the unique dread and misery of that period, but also expand outwards in such a way as to not make this merely a pandemic book. Catastrophe is kind of everywhere all the time now! Just a non-stop three-ring chaos circus 24/7! I think this mood of absurdity would have found its way onto every page of the book whether I had written it then or not, but the timing absolutely shaped the character of the collection.

A lot of the poems have this momentum like you’re trying to get to the bottom of something. You follow an idea as it spirals to its origin. “Ekphrastic” is one of my favorites. It begins in an empty museum with a sort of tribute to the people who would usually populate these galleries. It ends at this Bunuelian parallel between them and the bloodied goldfinch watching Christ. You strike the perfect balance between spontaneity and deliberation in the way you structure your poems. Do you begin with a place in mind you need the reader to arrive at, or are you as surprised as the reader when these ideas and images come together?

KR: Yes! Thank you! I love that description, like every poem is a ride down the tornado side on the playground. Each of these poems was a riff on a prompt provided by Kim or one of the other April poem-a-day group members and in some cases, I stuck pretty closely to what they were requesting and in others I departed wildly. But in all cases, I tried to open with an initial topic or premise or idea that I wanted to pay as much attention as possible to. There is no such thing as thinking too hard is one of my mottos. So I wanted to think and feel and muse for a sustained amount of time on every poem in the book. I think it was this balance of having a restraint and then letting myself spiral freely that led to the feeling of spontaneity and deliberation that you describe. I was mostly trying first and foremost to have fun and amuse myself, to play around and reveal some new insights which I then hoped would make their way across to the hearts and minds of my future readers.

How did you decide on the form these poems would take- the combination of prose poem and stanzas that feel like self-contained statements as much as they bound into the next one? 

KR: Rose Metal Press, the small nonprofit publisher I co-founded in 2006 with my friend Abby Beckel, specializes in hybrid genres and so it made sense to me to let this project be a hybrid. I think these are prose poems of sorts? Definitely poems, but not in line breaks or stanzas, more in aphoristic sections and stanzagraphs. I wanted to let the process proceed by way of the sentence and not the line and to play with gaps and white space between really big and dramatic imagery and utterances and jokes and punchlines. Some of the poems actually ended up getting published as essays and flash nonfiction, so I don’t think that I’m enforcing a clear genre boundary with any of them.

In “The State Or Period Of Being A Child,” you describe a prompt you give to students. “Long shot, middle shot, close-up. Gradually zoom us in, really letting us see it.”  You could say that prompt describes many of these poems, the way you follow an idea down a rabbit hole. How does your practice as a writer inform your teaching, and vice versa?

KR: That prompt is from Janet Burrorway’s wonderful textbook Imaginative Writing, which I use in my Creative Writing class and I love assigning it in-class each quarter because like you say, it sets students off into an intriguing rabbit hole that can take them a surprising distance away. I love receiving prompts for my writing and so naturally I love giving them.

Part of why I love Poems While You Wait so much is because when you are out in the world encountering randos and asking them to give you money and a topic for a personal one-of-a-kind poem, you are forced to write about things you might never have touched otherwise. I let that curiosity and chance into my own practice as much as I can even when I am not doing PWYW and try to bring it to bear in the classroom, too.

The collection is rife with religion, astrology, mythology, mysticism- the loathe/desire to believe in something or other figures as a recurring theme. In absence of social norms and a normal climate, do you find believing in something greater than the individual is useful, or even necessary, where hope feels like too much of a stretch?

KR: Solidarity—I believe in solidarity, as in the unity of a group or class that produces or is based on a community of interests, objectives, and standards. Hope is hard but I always have it because I do believe that even in a world that wants—and uses both mainstream and social media to propagate—to make us constantly terrified and competitive and angry, we can opt instead to find common cause. I believe in fun. Joy as form of resistance. Racialized misogynistic capitalism wants nothing more than to normalize misery and I believe in saying no to that and then creating spaces and communities and relationships that offer alternatives.  

Told to be present and quit doomsurfing, you offer us, as an alternative, curated streams of your own content- stray thoughts, geography, definitions, memes, histories, factoids- punctuated by startling imagism. I loved the line in “A Quiet State After Some Period Of Disturbance (a poem that might feature at least one of everything I just listed), “If calm were a tree it would be deciduous- shedding its leaves, putting them forth again.” Then, you end the following and final stanza with a voice over the CTA intercom, an unforeseen source of reassurance. Can you talk about finding poetry in unexpected places? In sampling from such an array of sources, including quotes from other poems, would you say there is an element of found art to the collection?

KR: Sampling—yes! I want these poems to be like a really great hip-hop song or a beautiful collage. Not something I created alone, but made with other people, both living and dead, both here and long gone. The imagination is a space that is potentially eternal and ideally shared. So I always try to let my imagination run wild over even seemingly quotidian things like commuting on the red line. Poetry, to me, is a very focused form of attention and when you “pay” attention to everything—even though that metaphor says you are expending currency—you are the one who is getting rich.

It’s hard to tell at times whether you see the glass as half full, or bone dry, but there is a sense of joy in these references you draw, in being fascinated by whatever fascinates you. There is an appeal to wonderment at the center of Where Are the Snows. Would you say taking an interest in the world around you, which can be its own struggle, is a source of self resolve?     

KR: The glass goes up and down from day to day for sure. But yes, I think that as long as you maintain a sense of wonder, as long as you don’t let this cruel world grind you down too into thinking that cruelty is natural or indifference is fine, you are in some small sense winning.

Lastly, is there a class you’re teaching next quarter, or anything happening around DePaul you’d like to throw a spotlight on?

KR: Yes! I hope people will sign up for my ENG 309 Youth & Malice class where we write about the periods of childhood and adolescence but for an adult audience. Those eras of human development are so full of conflict and tension and emotion and interest, it always makes for a very fun class.

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The Return of DePaul University Day at the Art Institute!

After a long, unavoidable hiatus, DePaul University Day at the Art Institute of Chicago is back! Join DePaul students, faculty, staff and retirees on Friday, September 30, 2022, 2:00 – 5:00 p.m.! Enjoy gallery talks by faculty and museum staff and music by DePaul alum, Hunter Diamond, at one of the world’s best museums and let DePaul foot the bill ~ admission is free!

Check out the schedule of gallery talks

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Minnesota State Arts Board Seeking Candidates For Key Positions

Are you looking for a position where you can make a difference?  Where you can help make arts and creative activities available to residents and communities throughout the state?  Where you can support the work of Minnesota’s creative individuals and organizations?  Then consider applying for a position at the Arts Board: 

Grant program officer – The person in this position will manage the Arts Board’s largest grant program, Operating Support, which provides general support to established arts organizations.  Applications must be submitted by Tuesday, October 11, 2022.

Grant programs assistant – The person in this position will provide administrative support for Arts Board grant programs.  Applications must be submitted by Thursday, October 6, 2022.

Executive assistant – The person in this position will provide administrative support to the executive director and to the board.  Applications must be submitted by Wednesday, September 28, 2022.

 All are full-time, permanent positions.  Telework and/or hybrid work arrangements are available.  

Visit the Arts Board’s Web site to find more details about the positions and a link to required qualifications, salary range, and application instructions: http://www.arts.state.mn.us/about/employment.htm/

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Apply for a Fellowship with HumanitiesX

HumanitiesX, DePaul’s Experiential Humanities Collaborative, seeks six Student Fellows for the 2022-23 year. These are 10-12 hour/week positions that run from Oct.-June, paying up to $6517/student. For engaged students interested in the environment, it’s a great opportunity.

Student Fellows assist faculty and community partners as they develop new HumanitiesX courses, and with the guidance of WRD Professor Lisa Dush, create public-facing humanities deliverables about environmental action at DePaul and beyond. The application deadline is 10/10. Applications can be submitted through the Campus Job Board.

For more info, click here

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Thinking About Heading West? Check Out University of Wyoming’s MA English Program

The folks at UW’s MA program in English have this to say:

  • Generous funding package for all accepted students, including a stipend of $12,000+ per academic year, with opportunities to earn up to an additional $3000 through summer teaching.
  • PhD and job placement in top programs (including Emory, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Stanford) and in private-/public-sector positions (3M, Library of Congress).
  • Joint-degree options and interdisciplinary coursework in other departments, including Gender and Women Studies, Environment and Natural Resources, African-American and Diaspora Studies, Native American and Indigenous Studies, and Latina/o Studies.
  • Up to two years of classroom teaching experience and training in composition pedagogy.
  • Nationally renowned mentorship in teaching preparation and a manageable teaching load (1 course per semester) for first-time teachers.
  • Generous support for students writing theses, including a thesis-completion course and up to $1000 per year in research and travel funding.
  • Outdoor activities in Laramie, which was recently ranked as the best small college town (http://www.collegevaluesonline.com/features/best-small-college-towns-in-america/).

UW is a fully-funded program: all admitted students receive stipends and tuition waivers for two years. Graduate students in the Department of English at UW have the opportunity to study and research in all areas of English and cultural studies, from poetry and film to popular culture and rhetorical theory. We offer concentrations in literature and in rhetoric and composition, together with a career-focused Public-Facing Thesis Portfolio capstone option. Our faculty have particular expertise in the medieval, early modern, and contemporary periods; in adaptation and cultural transmission; in empire and enslavement; and in interdisciplinary and eco-critical approaches. We take pride in our flexible curriculum and diverse teaching opportunities that give students the competencies to pursue both academic paths and careers in government, non-profits, and education.

For more information about the MA in English at UW and the application procedure, please see: http://www.uwyo.edu/englishma. The deadline to apply is February 1, 2023.

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See Professor Kathleen Rooney Read From Her New Collection, Where Are the Snows, at Sunday Salon Chicago

WHEN: September 25, 2022 @7:00 pm (arrive @6:30 pm)
WHERE: The Reveler, Roscoe Village (back room, to the right)
3403 N. Damen Ave., Chicago IL 60618

This is the first in-person event held by Sunday Salon Chicago since the reading series went to Zoom due to Covid related constraints. Other featured authors include Meg Tuite (Poetry), Tina Jenkins Bell (Fiction), Lynn Sloan (Fiction) & Larry O. Dean (Poetry).

Featuring: Book giveaways, music and pizza with Roscoe Books selling titles by the authors on site!

Learn more at: Sunday Salon Chicago

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Don’t Miss This:

Do you have an interest in graphic novels or discussing complicated issues in writing? Join Prof. Royster Prof. Shanahan for a free-form discussion about graphic novels, present and future, in the context of “Freedom to Read,” the One Book One Chicago theme for this year, and “Banned Books Week.” The discussion will take place from 10:10-11:10 Thursday, Sept. 22 in ALH 305. For more information on Banned Books Week, please visit the following links. If you’re interested in joining, please submit an interest in this google form, in order for us to get a headcount for the room.  https://forms.gle/PM6x7zSiquMRHrs79

Banned Books Week September 18-24, 2022

and https://www.ala.org/advocacy/intfreedom/freedomreadstatement

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Get Your Foot in the Door: New Internship Opportunities for BIPOC Students!

PubWest is launching their Fall internship program and is looking to place BIPOC students in paid entry-level positions within the publishing industry. This is a six month long, paid internship. The deadline to apply is September 30 and interviews will be held from October 3-7. Don’t sleep on this opportunity! If you’re interested, follow the links below!

For more information: PubWest – Intern Program

Or if you’re ready to apply: Internship Application

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A Unique Teaching Opportunity for Musicians:

Intonation Music is a Bronzeville-based youth development/music education nonprofit. Right now they are looking to fill several different positions with people passionate about both music and community outreach: Lead Instructor, Co-Instructor and Development Manager. If you are interested in this very important opportunity, and in helping bring music to the youth of Chicago, click here to check out their full Employment Opportunities page.

As described by Intonation Music themselves ::: Offered in partnership with schools, park districts, and community organizations, our year-round classes make music accessible to youth by providing them with instruments, instruction, mentorship, and the chance to perform on stages across the city. Each Intonation student takes part in a personal and team approach to practice, setting goals, and problem-solving; and over time, they gain the confidence to take charge of their direction and seek out new experiences.

  • Intonation is seeking committed, part-time instructors to teach our youth-centered Modern Band program for students in grades 3-12 (6:1, student: instructor ratio) for 2022-2023. Students love our engaging and challenging programs that they shape and lead! Our team of instructors uplift relationship-based learning, live performances, and recording opportunities for youth. We are looking to hire 2 new Instructors ASAP for our fall programs!
  • Intonation Music also seeks an energetic Development and Communications Manager (DCM) who is passionate about youth development and music’s power to change, strengthen, and unify individuals and communities. This key position is a member of Intonation’s leadership team and will be relied on for facilitation, problem solving, and proactive measures to drive the mission forward. Successful candidates will have a demonstrated passion for non-profit service and an ability to coalesce and engage diverse groups of people. 
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Calling for Volunteers to Serve on the Fulbright Campus Committee

With the national deadline (11 October) to apply for the Fulbright fast approaching, the Campus Committee is asking for volunteers to read applications and participate in interviews with the candidates. The campus interview and assessment are critical aspects of a student’s application and can greatly enhance their chances of obtaining this prestigious fellowship, which makes this an excellent and important service opportunity.

The interviews for the applications received to date will take place via Zoom between 9:00am-12:00noon CDT on Thursday 22 September, Friday 23 September, Tuesday 27 September, and Thursday 29 September. 

If you’re interested in volunteering, or would like more information on applying for the Fulbright, please contact Rachel at rachel.scott@depaul.edu!

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Interested in Applying for the Fulbright?

With the national deadline to apply, October 11, coming up, now is the perfect time to start your application! The Fulbright Scholarship allows students to travel abroad teaching English, or conducting research and study. All graduating seniors, graduate students, and alumni are eligible to apply. Interested?

Rachel Scott will be holding an information session on the Fulbright this Thursday 15 September at 3:00pm via Zoom.  She will provide an overview of the Fulbright before focusing on “undersubscribed” awards, which are good options for students who are beginning their applications now.  Interested students can RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/fulbright-information-session-tickets-416956296507.

You can reach out to Rachel for more information, or to volunteer on the Fulbright Campus Committee by shooting her an email at: rachel.scott@depaul.edu.

You can also find more information regarding the scholarship at https://us.fulbrightonline.org

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An Inconvenient Hour:

In addition to the excitement of the Printer’s Row Literary Festival this weekend in Chicago, faculty members Tara Betts (poet) and Michele Morano (creative nonfiction/memoir) will be part of “An Inconvenient Hour” reading series 5:30-6:30pm Saturday, 9/10 at Metropolis Coffee Shop, 1039 W. Granville Ave. Poets Tony Trigilio and Mary Ardery will also read. More information here.

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Upcoming Book by DePaul Alum, Zhanna Slor: Breakfall

Author of At The End of the World, Turn Left, Zhanna Slor’s upcoming book Breakfall is a domestic thriller about a young mother, fresh off a divorce, whose sultry affair with a married police officer leads to a scandal, but when people at her Jiu Jitsu gym start dying and disappearing, the only connection is Mina herself. 

To be published by Agora Books and released in Spring 2023

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Apprenticeship at One Story

One Story has an exciting opportunity for a rising college senior or class of ’22 grad: a paid apprenticeship.

This position is ideal for a young person who hopes to work in the publishing or non-profit sector. They are specifically seeking applicants from backgrounds traditionally underrepresented in the publishing industry.

This is an opportunity to gain valuable skills and forge connections with peers and potential employers. In addition to experience gained from day-to-day tasks, the apprentice will receive specialized training in marketable skill sets such as design and production, project management, social media and marketing, proofreading and copyediting, online pedagogy best practices, and others.

The goal is for the apprentice to leave their time with One Story with industry connections and a diverse and varied set of skills that will make their resumes stand out to future employers. The apprenticeship runs from September 2022 to May 2023.

The time commitment for this position is 15 hours a week. An exact schedule will be determined upon hiring, but the apprentice should expect to spend at least one full day a week in the office, with the rest of the work done remotely. They will receive regular performance reviews to help ensure that they are getting the most out of the experience. They should reside within commuting distance of our office in Gowanus, Brooklyn.

The apprentice will be paid stipend totaling $10,000 for the 9 month period. 

Applications are due May 16th. For more information, and to apply, visit their website.

Thank you!

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Professor Kathleen Rooney’s Newest Poetry Collection

Professor Rooney’s latest poetry collection, which won the XJ Kennedy Prize from Texas Review Press, is coming out this Fall and is now available for pre-order through TRPAmazon, and B&N. 

You can read more about it through the links and in these blurbs:

“In Kathleen Rooney’s Where are the Snows, profound and hilarious stanzas underpin a philosophy for living in an era that feels post-claiming-to-be-post-anything. The book is both a modern pastoral with startled, awestruck observations about everything from the economy to Wednesdays and a deeply emotional elegy for a complicated, yet beloved, spirituality. Rooney’s adroit use of language reveals how nostalgia and history are their own kinds of mysticism and—my favorite—that time itself is just a metaphysical joke. I mean, c’mon, her dedication reads: To the future. Rooney is at her funniest in this book, and in all the best ways: subversive, nerdy, and tragic. You won’t believe how saintly I’ve become. She writes. Big halo energy. This is a great book.”
— Sommer Browning, Author of Good Actors 

“Reading Kathleen Rooney’s Where Are The Snows is refreshing. Here is a book unafraid to face the various crises of the world and admit it might not work out. The magic of Rooney’s writing is its lightness: funny, playful, cynical, indulgently dark, and poignant, Where Are The Snows is always delightful. I promise you won’t be able to stop reading these poems.”
—José Olivarez, Author of Citizen Illegal 

“Kathleen Rooney’s Where Are the Snows is a book of investigative improvisation—interested in the loss and whereabouts of everyday goodness, the futility of contemporary politics and capitalism, the transience of joy and sorrow. Her supercharged lyrics pulse with interruption, iteration, and inference. They juxtapose absurd facts and self-deprecating queries with the timing of a standup comedian. Half heartbreaking, half hilarious, this book is 100% punk rock.”
—Marcus Wicker, author of Silencer 

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Call for Papers: Creating Knowledge Submit by 5 pm on Friday, May 6, 2022

The English department is now seeking submissions for the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences’ undergraduate research journal, Creating Knowledge. Faculty members from the English department will choose one essay to represent the department in this year’s publication.  If you would like to have your essay considered for publication, please email a copy of your paper as a Word document to Professor Rebecca Cameron at rcameron@depaul.edu by 5 pm on Friday, May 6th. Please include your full name and student ID number in the body of the email. Your essay must meet the following requirements:

  • Include original research using primary and/or secondary sources; papers written in Research Intensive courses, Independent Studies, or the Newberry Seminar would be excellent options.
  • Have been written in a course in the English department or in the Newberry Seminar.
  • Be between 3000 and 5000 words.
  • Be formatted according to MLA standards and include a works cited page.

If you have any questions, please contact Professor Rebecca Cameron at rcameron@depaul.edu.

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National Book Critics Circle Emerging Critics Fellowship: Call for Applications

The National Book Critics Circle’s general or student membership is available, as well as mentorship through their program, the National Book Critics Circle Emerging Critics Fellowship, which seeks to identify, nurture, and support the development of the next generation of book critics. Applications open Friday, April 8.

In addition to the Emerging Critics Fellowship, the National Book Critics Circle honors outstanding writing and fosters a national conversation about reading, criticism, and literature. They serve nearly 800 member critics, authors, literary bloggers, book publishing professionals, student members, and friends, offering access to tips on book reviewing, an annually updated guide to publications that accept freelance pitches for reviews, plus a variety of discounts on literary magazines. Members also have the opportunity to nominate titles for their annual awards and to serve as a judge for the John Leonard Prize for Best First Book and the new translation award, as well as to elect board members. You can learn more about what we do at bookcritics.org. Information about NBCC membership, including our $15 student membership, can be found at bookcritics.org/membership/.

The Emerging Critics Fellowship is open to critics of all ages and experience who seek to review and write about books for print and digital outlets. Applicants may or may not have previously published book reviews. The NBCC seeks a broad range of diverse applicants, especially those who have demonstrated a genuine interest and commitment to engaging in a critical conversation about books. The NBCC Emerging Critics Program is an interactive, participatory program guided by the philosophy that critical thought can be fostered and enriched through dialogue within a cohort of similarly-interested critics. 

Emerging Critics Fellowship benefits:
– One-on-one mentorship from board members
– Small group Q&A with board members
– Small group professional development/ craft lectures over Zoom
– NBCC membership/ dues waived for 1 year

The NBCC is interested in encouraging people who are great thinkers and writers but who need support along the path to becoming an active critic. Their fellowship aims to break down financial and geographical barriers for emerging critics. In particular, BIPOC critics, LGBTQIA+ critics, critics with disabilities, and critics from historically resilient communities are encouraged to apply. Information about the fellowship application can be found at bookcritics.org/emerging-critics/fellowship/.

Applications are due Friday, May 6. If you are interested in learning more about the fellowship or have questions about the application process, please join a short informational Zoom session on Friday, April 22 at 7:00 PM ET. Register at tinyurl.com/ECF22.

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William Faulkner Literary Competition Open Now

The William Faulkner Literary Competition 2022 is now accepting entries in the areas of Novel, Short Story, One Act Play and Poetry.

Details are:

Novel
Entry Fee of $50
Deadline July 15, 2022
Winner receives $2000

One Act Play
Entry Fee of $20
Deadline July 31, 2022
First Place receives $600
Second Place receive $300
Third Place receives $200

Poetry
Entry Fee of $20
Deadline July 31, 2022
First Place receives $600
Second Place receive $300
Third Place receives $200

Short Story
Entry Fee of $20
Deadline July 31, 2022
First Place receives $600
Second Place receive $300
Third Place receives $200

For rules and how to enter, go to www.williamfaulknerliterarycompetition.com 

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Submit Your Poetry!

The Arkansas International, a literary magazine sponsored by The University of Arkansas Graduate Program in Creative Writing and Translation, invites you to submit to their C.D. Wright Emerging Poet’s Prize, with a grand prize of $1,000 and publication and an Editor’s Choice prize of $250 and publication.

The Arkansas International is incredibly excited to announce that this year’s contest is being judged by award-winning poet Patricia Smith. 

More information can be found at https://www.arkint.org/cd-wright-prize

If you have any questions, reach out to publicity@arkint.org