Sunday Salon Chicago

Stay warm with prose and poetry at
Sunday Salon Chicago

Sunday, November 20
7:00 P.M.
The Riverview Tavern
1958 Roscoe Ave.

The Readers:


Mary Hawley is a poet, novelist, and occasional translator. Her poetry collection Double Tongues was published by Tia Chucha Press. Her poems have appeared in many journals and anthologies including Notre Dame Review, qarrtsiluni, Mudlark, and The Bloomsbury Review, and she was the co-translator of the bilingual poetry anthology Astillas de luz/Shards of Light (Tia Chucha Press). She is currently seeking an agent for her first novel, The Sparkle Experiment.


Maggie Kast’s first novel, A Free, Unsullied Land, was published by Fomite Press  in 2015. She is the author of The Crack between the Worlds: a dancer’s memoir of loss, faith and family, published by Wipf and Stock. She received an M.F.A. in writing from Vermont College of Fine Arts and has published fiction in The Sun, Nimrod, Carve, Paper Street, Rosebud and others. Two stories have received Pushcart nominations. A chapter of her memoir, published in ACM/Another Chicago Magazine, won a Literary Award from the Illinois Arts Council. Her essays have appeared in America, Image, Writer’s Chronicle, Fiction Writers Review and elsewhere.


Mike Puican has had poems in Poetry, Michigan Quarterly Review, Bloomsbury Review, and New England Review, among others. His essays and reviews have appeared in TriQuarterly, Kenyon Review, Brevity, and MAKE Magazine. He won the 2004 Tia Chucha Press Chapbook Contest for his chapbook, 30 Seconds. Mike was a member of the 1996 Chicago Slam Team and for the past ten years has been president of the board of the Guild Literary Complex in Chicago.


Christine Sneed is the author of the novels Paris, He Said and Little Known Facts, and the story collections Portraits of a Few of the People I’ve Made Cry and The Virginity of Famous Men, which was published in September 2016. Her stories or essays have been included in The Best American Short Stories, O. Henry Prize Stories, New Stories from the Midwest, New York Times, San Francisco Chronicle, Ploughshares, New England Review, and a number of other periodicals. Christine is the faculty director of Northwestern University’s MA/MFA program in creative writing; she is also on the fiction faculty of the Regis University low-residency MFA program.

AptAmigo Internship

AptAmigo is seeking interns to write content for their blog. Their internship description is below. If you are selected, contact Professor Chris Green ( for Winter Quarter credit.

Job Title: Content Creation Intern

Job Objective: Creating Chicago and real estate specific content for AptAmigo’s blog; learning how to maximize your posts’s impact using SEO and social media.

What we’re looking for:

  • You are a creative, self-starter who can easily complete a 500 word post within1-2 hours.
  • You can producing one completed post per week.  
  • You are self-motivated to complete tasks, and are enthusiastic about taking on new assignments.
  • Ability to navigate and use Google Drive.

What you will learn:

  • Hone your creative writing and editing skills through content creation for AptAmigo’s blog.
  • Learn the basics of SEO for blogging; utilization of Google AdWords.
  • Basic html code for Ghost blogging platform.
  • Create your own social media strategy to promote your posts.

What to expect if you work with us:

  • A typical blog post request will require a 500 word min/max.
  • Posts must be related to real estate and/or Chicago.
  • You are more than welcome to pitch us your own post ideas. We love hearing new and creative ideas, and are more than happy to listen and collaborate if the post would be a good fit.
  • The content will be posted to our AptAmigo blog and will be shared on social media, as well as other online outlets that choose to promote us.
  • All content you produce will be posted under your name as the original author.
  • Expect a fast paced lifestyle, and earn bragging points through working in the glamorous start-up world!

What will we NOT tolerate?

AptAmigo has a strict policy against any form of plagiarism. Our goal is to deliver original content that is a product of our writers’ own thinking. Submitting someone else’s’ work is against our policy and will result in the termination of your services.

To apply, email

Veterans Spat On, Called ‘Baby Killers’: The Mythical Imagery of America’s Lost War in Vietnam

DePaul’s English Department and Big Shoulders Books are co-sponsoring an event on

Monday, October 24, 6:00 p.m.
Veterans Spat On, Called ‘Baby Killers’:
The Mythical Imagery of America’s Lost War in Vietnam
a lecture by Professor Jerry Lembcke, College of the Holy Cross
Richardson Library 400 (Dorothy Day Room)



Professional Exploration Program

Experience firsthand the life of a professional in an industry you are curious about exploring! This job shadow, the Professional Exploration Program (PEP), is a unique opportunity that exposes you to potential career paths and work environments in a 9-5 workday. PEP introduces you to work cultures as well as careers that relate to your interests and skills. This is an opportunity you don’t want to miss because it’s offered only once a year! 
Deadline to apply is Nov. 6th.   

A Celebration of the Short Story

by Albora Memushi
contributor to the Underground

On Thursday, October 13th, in Room 115 of the Richardson Library, students and professors prepared to begin A Celebration of the Short Story. Cupcakes, fruits, and sodas were displayed to the right of the room. As some ate a quick bite, others mingled with writers Christine Sneed and Kristin FitzPatrick or discussed the events of their day. The seats filled quickly, and some individuals had to stand up along the wall. The writers took their seats and the event began promptly at six in the evening.

The moderator gave a quick welcome and introduced both authors.

Christine Sneed teaches creative writing for the MFA programs at Northwestern University and the University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign. The Virginity of Famous Men is her fourth book. Other books include Little Known Facts, Portraits of a Few of the People I’ve Made Cry, and Paris, He Said.

Kristin FitzPatrick is a DePaul alum and teaches at DePaul’s School for New Learning. Her debut book, My Pulse Is An Earthquake, is a collection of short stories that was published in 2015. Kristin was primarily a film student at DePaul, prior to switching her major to English.

FitzPatrick read “A New Kukla” from My Pulse Is An Earthquake. After a round of applause, Sneed introduced her new story collection The Virginity of Famous Men and read “Roger Weber Would Like To Stay.”

Another round of applause followed and the moderator invited the audience to ask their questions.

When asked about the ways teaching informs their writing, Sneed jumped in with a smile: “Teaching has made me a better writer.” FitzPatrick said, “Teaching and writing complement each other for me. I see myself as a student in my own class.”

Among other things, Sneed and FitzPatrick discussed the different ways their writing is influenced by film and Hollywood. Said Sneed, “Having unmediated experiences is often hard to come by. Having a chance to write fiction, or nonfiction or a poem, you enter a part of your brain that is informed by fantasies.”

Being an English major, I adored this event. I always look forward to such events to learn and explore the different possibilities that are available for English majors. Within an hour we were introduced to two new wonderful books and we learned some of the ins and outs of being a writer.

Kristin FitzPatrick and Christine Sneed were most kind as they shared their own experiences in the publishing world with the audience and joyfully gave us advice on how to be persistent in creating our paths as writers.

Submit to Miscellany

The editorial staff of Miscellany at the College of Charleston in Charleston, South Carolina, invites undergraduate students to submit creative writing and visual arts pieces for consideration in our 2017 issue. Miscellany welcomes all undergrads across the United States to submit their work, especially if they have not yet before had the opportunity to submit to a competitive literary and arts journal.

Founded in 1980 by poet Paul Allen and his student, John Aiello, Miscellany has been dedicated for decades to providing a competitive venue for emerging undergraduate writers to submit their work for publication, and as of 2015, we opened up our submissions to all undergraduates across the nation.

We select submissions in a workshop-style setting with a staff of about twelve volunteers, led by the Editor-in-Chief and Managing Editor. Submissions are judged by content, originality, craft, and on how well they fit in with the publication as a whole. We ask that interested students submit before December 6th, 2016. The annual publication is released every April.

Past issues of Miscellany as well as instructions on how to submit can be found on our website at There, you can also find contests (the current ones end October 21st), the creative works of our staff, and other articles and interviews.

Do More Things: Navigating Post-grad Opportunities for English Majors

by Valerie Walker
contributor to the Underground

“Do more things. Do different things,” Gabrielle Zenoni, the Canine Manager at the Animal Care League and one of the speakers at Tuesday’s career workshop “From Major to Minor,” reflected on what she’d tell her undergraduate self if she could go back in time.

Sitting in a lecture room with a couple dozen people, all fellow English majors, makes a person immediately introspective. Everyone in the room had heard the canned, “So you want to be a teacher?” question from puzzled friends and family, those trying to understand why we’d pick such an “unspecialized” field for our Future. The reigning feeling in the room was that even though English appeals to different personalities, it draws similar spirits.

Tuesday’s panel of professionals all had done something decidedly non-English with their degrees. It’s usually intimidating and weighty, other people’s success. However, throughout the first half hour, the panel detailed their unconventional career paths: Dean of Culture, Legislative Director, Public Relations Specialist, Research Associate, Canine Manager—not exactly typical English-major jobs. Finally, they started unraveling those “endless possibilities” we hear about but rarely see.

Each panel member revealed the key skills they gained from their English undergraduate that they regularly use in their current jobs, skills they think many English majors don’t even recognize they have. There were two major themes that cohesively ran through each person’s identified skills: communication and empathy. These skills were chiefly responsible for setting them apart from other job applicants in non-traditional career fields. For example, a market analyst from here at DePaul, Coleen Dickman, described her experience interviewing for her current position by explaining that the other candidates were techy, scientific, market-savvy, etc. What set her apart was her ability to construct coherent marketing materials, something she was prepared for through her English education.

Other candidates had similar stories, some even saying that employers are going to train their new employees regardless of their degree specialty, but they can’t train them in critical, empathetic, and basic grammatical skills. Gabrielle Zenoni said that her reading countless novels, writing from different perspectives, and critically working to understand other characters’ emotions through English study fostered her ability to empathize with people—and with animals. Even though she doesn’t do a lot of writing or “reading Dickens” in her current job as Canine Manager, she feels her background in English has given her skills pertinent to her job.

In a different reflection on the past, Annie Davis, a former teacher and current Director at the Education Pioneers in Chicago, expressed her regret over choosing to teach after college. She chose it because she loved literature, not because she loved teaching children. This example is pertinent even beyond those considering a career in education, and speaks to our desire to pursue something because it’s easy, expected, or conventional. The vein of this panel was to dispel the fear of pursuing niche jobs, the ones we don’t hear about at career fairs or on a Google search of “Top 10 Careers for English Majors.”

The last consensus among the panelists was on the subject of internships. They all agreed that they should have pursued internships that diverged from writing, publishing, education, etc. They encouraged the attendees to apply for internships (and jobs) that explicitly express interest in students with different majors: economics, marketing, biology. These positions will push English majors to sell themselves and the skills they’ve developed that wouldn’t be listed in a job posting. On the subject of internships, Professor Chris Green, who emails internship opportunities to English majors, shared that only around half of the posts get filled because students are afraid to apply, thinking they’re unqualified. He encouraged students, saying, “You shouldn’t feel bad if you don’t know what you want to do.”

That thought brought us full circle back to Gabrielle Zenoni’s “Do more things. Do different things.” Try an internship in an unconventional field, market your invaluable communication skills, and never forget the skills learned in an English major are preparation for niche careers with thousands of job titles never heard of that may be the perfect fit!