DePaul English Social Media Poetry Event

Celebrate National Poetry Month in April by posting your favorite poems OR your own original poetry on social media. The DePaul English Department would love to hear your poems on resilience & fortitude. From 3/21-4/30, tag our social media (@DePaul_English on Twitter & Instagram) in your poetry post & we will re-post your content on our platforms!

Call for Submissions: 2020 Spring English Conference

The 2020 Spring English Conference, hosted by DePaul’s English department, is now open for submissions! Please see the attached flyer and full submissions guidelines for information on how to submit your writing:

2020 English Conference Full Submissions Guidelines

2020 Spring English Conference Call for Submissions

Call for Submissions: Propeller Collective

Propeller Collective, a nonprofit that provides support for first generation and limited-income students, is currently looking for any first generation and/or low income students that would be interested in becoming a featured guest writer!

The editors ask that students write about a topic that would fall under the category of career, on campus, back home, motivation, or personal growth. If this interests you, you can contact managing editor Caley Koch directly at caley@propellercollective.org or fill out our quick questionnaire on their website.

Visit the Propeller Collective website for more information.

Book Review: The Bride Test by Helen Hoang

Diversity Can Exist in America, and In Romance Novels Too

By Morgan Kail-Ackerman
Contributor to The Underground

The Bride Test by Helen Hoang is a 2019 contemporary romance novel book that is sure to melt your heart, and keep you excited the entire time. Although this is the second book in the series, you can follow characters and plot without reading The Kiss Quotient, the first book in Hoang’s universe.

This beautiful love story is a modern Cinderella retelling, but this time the story is told with diversity and equality. It follows Esme, a Vietnamese woman, who is given the opportunity to live in America by Cô Nga, the mother of our romantic male hero, as long as she tries to seduce Khai into marriage. Khai, on the other hand, is dealing with the death of his best friend, Andy. As someone who is told over and over that he cannot feel emotions due to his autism, Khai believes he has a heart of stone and blames himself for Andy’s death.

The Bride Test has a perfect balance of everything you will want. It is a well-written story, gives fully dimensional characters, and keeps you interested with every page. On the whole, it is a romance novel that makes you fall in love with these characters, root for their relationship, and believe in everything they are fighting for.

In addition to being a solid romance novel, the story pushes diversity in the romance genre. Both of the romantic leads are people of color, and one is not American. Throughout the novel, Esme speaks in Vietnamese or choppy English. In fact, the last line of the novel is in Vietnamese.

The book also features a positive, well-written representation of autism from Helen Hoang, who is autistic herself. We learn from and support Khai as he figures out his autism and emotions. Esme is likewise not well-educated, and spends parts of the novel trying to find herself while seeking higher education. These aspects are not generally seen in a mainstream romance novel, so Helen Hoang’s novel brings a gorgeous new story to the landscape of the modern romance genre.

Nevertheless, The Bride Test can be a little predictable. It is a Cinderella-retelling and the plot is straightforward, so maybe that is where the predictability lies. Yet it is a positive predictability. You can guess where the novel is going, but that does not mean you will not enjoy the ride.

If you are looking for a contemporary and diverse romance novel, look no further! The Bride Test is for anyone who is looking for a beautiful and sexy love story.