Study Abroad Opportunity: Vienna and Berlin

Don’t miss this opportunity to study in two German-speaking countries: Vienna and Berlin programs are accepting applications until February 1st!

Read more about each of the programs below by clicking on the programs and viewing the Study Abroad office’s brochures.

Germany: Navigating the Refugee Experience in Berlin in Summer 2020

Vienna: Illinois in Vienna Program (IiVP) starting Fall 2020

For more information on all the programs DePaul has to offer, financial aid and scholarships, and student testimonials on SoJournal aka DePaul’s study abroad resource blog, and more, visit the Study Abroad website.

Study Abroad Opportunity: Identities Abroad@Mexico

English majors: complete LSP 200 in Mexico as part of the Identities Abroad program!

Identities Abroad@Mexico is a new program that fulfills the Multicultural seminar requirement and includes a travel component to Mexico City and Chiapas in June to study immigration and human rights. The LSP 200 course takes place in Spring. There are scholarships available and applications are due Feb 1.

This program is part of the Identities Abroad program series which are low-cost programs that are designed for underrepresented students, including but not limited to students of color, first generation students, and low-income students. While Identities Abroad programs are designed with underrepresented students in mind, all students are welcome to apply to the program(s).

See the attached flyer for more details:

IA Mexico flyer 2020

Study Abroad Opportunity: Harry Potter and the Fan Experience

Join Profs. Paul Booth and Rebecca Johns-Trissler for a unique Study Abroad trip: Harry Potter and the Fan Experience!

The Harry Potter story is more than just a wildly popular children’s book series, it is an international phenomenon encompassing literature, film, drama, multimedia experiences, and fan culture. Taking unique advantage of two 4-credit DePaul courses — ENG 286 (Topics in Popular Literature) and MCS 363 (Topics in Fan Studies) — students in this short-term study abroad program will have the opportunity to delve deeply into the Harry Potter experience through readings, screenings, discussions, and in-person visits to sites of literary and cultural significance related to the Harry Potter series.

This short-term study abroad program will focus on sites that influenced the writing of the Harry Potter novels and the filming of the series—including visits to the Warner Bros. Studios in London and a performance of The Cursed Child in the West End—to enhance students’ understanding of the themes and issues of the story as well as the experience of Harry Potter fandom in general.

https://programsabroad.depaul.edu/index.cfm?FuseAction=Programs.ViewProgram&Program_ID=10325

Important facts:

• The program fulfills two graduation requirements: A&L credit and experiential learning credit
• The courses will meet Monday nights in the Loop during Spring quarter
• Travel dates are 6/15-6/26
• The deadline to apply is February 1

Questions? Email Prof. Johns-Trissler at rjohnstr@depaul.edu.

Abroad Opportunity: City Internships

City Internships has launched their 2020 Internship Program application process and invites students to apply. 

Their Student Aid offering is still open. The calculator for students to check their eligibility is available here.

CI’s Global Explorer Programs in Chicago, San Francisco, Melbourne, Medellin, Santiago and Shanghai are filling quickly. Apply sooner rather than later.

Students can of course continue applying to CI’s other larger and longer-running Internship Program locations; which include London, Los Angeles, New York City and more.

Apply now at: https://city-internships.com/apply

See also the attached flyer and CI’s website for further details. 

CI Student Ambassador Program 2020 Flyer

Writing Workshops Abroad: Ireland and Italy

The University of New Orleans Writing Workshops Abroad invite undergraduate and graduate students from around the globe to apply for a summer of scholarship and cultural activities in Cork, Ireland and at Brunnenburg Castle, Italy.

In the summer of 2020 UNO Ireland: Writing Workshops & Creative Arts will continue for its eighth consecutive year, with courses in creative writing, plus options in literature, history, and fine arts. After taking a look at the program’s courses and award-winning faculty, consider submitting an application.

UNO-Ireland Program 2020 details:

Dates: June 16-July 18, 2020

Program Cost: 32 days for $5,195, which includes the application fee, tuition for six credit hours, apartment-style housing (private rooms and bathrooms),study abroad health insurance; meals on class days; opening and closing receptions; transportation passes; readings, and more.

For 2020, UNO also plans to offer the Writing Workshops at Brunnenburg Castle, a smaller, poetry-based program housed at Ezra Pound’s castle in northern Italy.  This program features a poetry-writing workshop and a seminar in the works of Ezra Pound. Applications for the Brunnenburg program are also open.

Brunnenburg Castle Program 2020 details:

Dates: June 29-July 25, 2020

Cost: $4,995 for guest students. This includes the application fee, tuition for six credit hours, housing, and study abroad health insurance; meals on class days; opening and closing receptions; weekend excursions to Venice and nearby towns and villages, readings, and more.

This exciting study abroad opportunity  is a great way to see another part of the world, and to either speed up the path to graduation, or take some classes you might otherwise not have been able to fit in.

Check out  past participant testimonials or view UNO’s summer 2020 brochure for Cork and Brunnenburg.

If you have any further questions about the University of New Orleans Writing Workshops Abroad, or would like to work directly with the program in the future, please contact writingabroad@uno.edu

Study Abroad in Germany

Don’t miss out on the opportunity to study abroad this summer in Germany with the “Germany: Navigating the Refugee Experience in Berlin” program! Applications close February 1, 2020.

Students will be traveling to Berlin for the last two weeks of June. Accompanying courses will be in the Spring. The program is open to undergraduates as well as graduates, and there are no language requirements.

Below are some the items on the trip itinerary:
Über den Tellerrand/“Better Plate”: Cooking class led by a cook who arrived in Berlin as a refugee and workshop with the Better Plate team about social gastronomy movements and using food as a form of social cohesion
Querstadtein tour: See one of Berlin’s neighborhoods through the eyes of a refugee tour guide
Refugio Café language tables: opportunity to use either English or German as a way to communicate at biweekly integrative language tables for refugees and other Berlin newcomers
Theatrical performance by the Exile ensemble at the Gorki Theater
Türkenmarkt and Mauerpark: visits to two large-scale, multicultural artisanal food and craft open air markets
Meetings with and presentations from NGOs and think tanks working on the ground to support refugee communities (Expert Council of German Federations on Integration and Migration, Caritas, Give Something Back to Berlin, Eed Be Eed Storytelling)
Visits to two refugee shelters: one in Berlin and one an hour outside of the city in the state of Brandenburg
• Understanding Germany and Europe in the 20th century through two installations: Topography of Terror (documents the systematic process of the Nazis’ rise to power, 1933-1945) and Tränenpalast (“Palace of Tears,” former border crossing point between East and West Berlin)
Comparative visit to Nuremberg to observe the history of Germany with regard to citizenship and belonging, through visits to the Palace of Justice and Nazi Documentation center

Those interested can view the full Study Abroad brochure, including courses and program fees, here.

Event Review: Bilingualism Unpacked

By Sara Shahein
Contributor to The Underground

On Wednesday, October 9th DePaul’s Office of Multicultural Student Success teamed up with the Latinx Center and Sigma Lambda Gamma sorority to host “Bilingualism Unpacked.” During the event, attendees listened to a panel of DePaul students and advisors answer questions about multilingualism – the panel’s languages ranged from Spanish to Serbian.

Each of the panelists were asked about their backgrounds and how they learned the languages they know today. Some learned their respective language when they were children, others learned the language in high school and college, and a few spoke the language first and learned English later. The panel noted that they switch languages when speaking with an adult whose native language is not English as a sign of respect and to make the individual feel more comfortable. They likewise discussed the importance of knowing another language and how it allows people to learn more about other cultures or even their own native cultures.

Each panelist was also asked if they had ever traveled abroad, if they spoke a native language abroad, and how were they perceived. A few panelists spoke about being seen as a local and felt more comfortable to take initiative and start up a conversation with locals.

Yet, when asked about the stigma that may arise from being bilingual, one panelist shared an example about having a conversation with someone in Serbian and mentioning that she was from Chicago. The opposite person immediately stopped speaking Serbian and switched to English. In response, the panelist said that she felt disappointed that the gentleman she was speaking to didn’t think she could continue to carry on the conversation if it was in Serbian, despite it being her first language. Other panelists explained that many non-English speakers or struggling English speakers tend to be looked down upon in society, instead of being given translators, assistance, or guidance to encourage them to continue trying to learn English.

The final question posed to the panelists asked whether they had ever denied being bilingual. Much to the surprise of the audience, a few panelists confirmed they had denied their ability to speak another language to others. One panelist explained that she worked in a law firm and it became known that she spoke and understood Spanish. She was quickly asked to translate and interpret, but she did not feel confident enough because she was still in the process of learning Spanish. She told the audience that, when it comes to work, she denies she is bilingual until she feels confident enough in her abilities.

Altogether, “Bilingualism Unpacked” showcased the reasons why someone would want to learn another language. It also taught other multilingual people in the audience how to deal with certain stigmas, present yourself when abroad, appreciate different cultures, and advocate for non-English speakers.