The Women’s Center Presents an Evening with Claudia Rankine on May 4

I’m not sure how it’d be possible, but there may be one or two people out there who’ve yet to hear about the dynamo that is Claudia Rankine.

Rankine is the author of five collections of poetry including Citizen: An American Lyric and Don’t Let Me Be Lonely; two plays including Provenance of Beauty: A South Bronx Travelogue; numerous video collaborations, and is the editor of several anthologies including The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mindcitizen.jpg

For her book  Citizen, Rankine won both the PEN Open Book Award and the PEN Literary Award, the NAACP Award, and the National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry (Citizen was the first book ever to be named a finalist in both the poetry and criticism categories); and was a finalist for the National Book Award. Citizen also holds the distinction of being the only poetry book to be a New York Times bestseller in the nonfiction category.

Among her numerous awards and honors, Rankine is the recipient of the Poets & Writers’ Jackson Poetry Prize and fellowships from the Lannan Foundation and the National Endowment of the Arts. She lives in California and is the Aerol Arnold Chair in the University of Southern California English Department.

…In a nutshell? Don’t miss this, English students!

Claudia Rankine Poster

 

Visiting Writers Series Welcomes DePaul MAWP Alum Jessica Chiarella Reading from Debut Novel “And Again”

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Exciting news this month for the DePaul English community: MAWP alumna Jessica Chiarella‘s debut novel, And Again, was published last week by Simon & Schuster. Chiarella is a native of Vernon Hills, IL and is currently in the creative writing MFA program at the University of California, Riverside.

The Chicago Tribune published an article last week in which Printers Row reporter Jeremy Mikula mentions that the first draft of the novel was written for Prof. Johns Trissler’s novel-writing class.

And Again explores the lives of four terminally ill medical patients who undergo an experimental medical procedure that erases their former ailments and illnesses. Check out the Kirkus Review of the novel here.

The DePaul Visiting Writers Series welcomes Chiarella for a reading at the Richardson Library next week. The event will take place Tuesday, January 26 at 6pm in Richardson 150.

 

DePaul & the English Department Welcome One, Book, One Chicago Selection Author Thomas Dyja | Thursday, November 5th

On November 5th, the Department of English is hosting two events with Thomas Dyja, author of the 2015/2016 One Book, One Chicago selection The Third Coast: When Chicago Built the American Dream.

At 4:30, Dyja will be meeting informally for a Q&A with DePaul Creative Writing students. At present, the discussion is scheduled to take place in the 2nd floor student lounge/resource room, though it will be moved to a larger venue depending on interest. If you are a creative writing student and would like to attend the discussion, contact Literacy Outreach Coordinator David Welch at dwelch3 (at) depaul.edu.

Then, at 6:00, Dyja will be reading in Richardson 115. (see flyer below)

We hope to see you at one or both events!

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REMINDER: Writer Matthew Gavin Frank Reading TONIGHT at 6pm in Richardson 115!

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An essayist and poet, Matthew Gavin Frank‘s most recent book, Preparing the Ghost–in which memory, mythology, and obsession collide in a strikingly original and enigmatic account of the first man to photograph a giant squid–was named a Shelf Awareness Best Book of 2014.
“Some stunning writing and perversely wonderful research.”–The New York Times Book Review

Frank is the author of the nonfiction books Preparing the Ghost: An Essay Concerning the Giant Squid and Its First Photographer, Pot Farm, and Barolo; the poetry books The Morrow Plots, Warranty in Zulu, and Sagittarius Agitprop, and 2 chapbooks. His essay collection/cookbook, The Mad Feast: An Ecstatic Tour Through America’s Food, is forthcoming November 2015 from W.W. Norton: Liveright. He teaches at Northern Michigan University, where he is the Nonfiction Editor of Passages North. This winter, he tempered his gin with two droplets (per 750ml) of tincture of odiferous whitefish liver. For health.

“Building Characters to Last” Master Class with Patrick Hicks on April 20th

Writer Patrick Hicks will be giving a reading on April 20th, 2015, which we recently posted about here. The Department of English is excited to announce that in addition to his reading (4/20 at 6 p.m. in Richardson 115) Patrick will be giving a master class titled “Building Characters to Last” that is open to all English students—no permission required. The class will be at 4 p.m. in the 3rd Floor conference room of ALH. Students can contact Professor Johns-Trissler at rjohnstr@depaul.edu with any questions.

Patrick Hicks’s The Commandant of Lubizec is a harrowing account of a death camp that never actually existed but easily could have in the Nazi state. It is a sensitive, accurate retelling of a place that went about the business of genocide. Told as a historical account in a documentary style, it explores the atmosphere of a death camp. It describes what it was like to watch the trains roll in, and it probes into the mind of its commandant, Hans-Peter Guth. How could he murder thousands of people each day and then go home to laugh with his children? This is not only an unflinching portrayal of the machinery of the gas chambers, it is also the story of how prisoners burned the camp to the ground and fled into the woods. It is a story of rebellion and survival. It is a story of life amid death.

This is a vividly detailed, terrifying, convincing, and completely spellbinding story rooted in those murderous events we now call the Holocaust. It is also the story of a loving, good-humored family man who each morning goes off to oversee mass homicide — a dramatic example of what Hannah Arendt once referred to as ‘the banality of evil.’  Patrick Hicks has accomplished a very difficult literary task. He has given a believable and fresh and original face to barbarism. What a fine book this is.”

– Tim O’Brien, author of The Things They Carried,
winner of the National Book Award