DePaul Humanities Center Presents “Making the Novel Novel: Lolita”, Wednesday Jan. 20, 2016

The DePaul Humanities Center continues its radical re-thinking of novels by turning its attention to Vladimir Nabokov’s classic, Lolita. The evening begins with the world premiere of “Young Matrix, Unknown Heart,” adapted for the stage from Nobakov’s novel by Dan Christmann, and performed and directed by Evan Hill and Melissa Lorraine. The performance including author Maryse Meijer, Danielle Meijer (DePaul University), and Shari L. Savage (Ohio State University), will investigate the various artwork used as book covers for Lolita and the complicated ways in which Lolita’s age may not be really the central moral question of the novel.

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A discounted parking rate is available. See Humanities Center staff at event for details.

TONIGHT! 24-Hour George Saunders!

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Please join the DePaul Humanities Center and the Office of the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences for a special event investigating the future of the humanities.

From 8:00 p.m. June 2 until 8:00 p.m. June 3, the DePaul Humanities Center will be hosting “24 Hour George Saunders,” a marathon, public reading of everything that best-selling author and MacArthur “genius grant” winner George Saunders has ever published, culminating in a new lecture by Saunders in the final hour entitled, “Why the Humanities? Why Art?” Celebrity readers include Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy, Academy Awardâ nominee Jesse Eisenberg, and a special surprise guest reader in the penultimate hour. Other DePaul faculty and students–as well as Chicago artists, authors, scholars, and celebrities–will also be reading for an hour according to the following schedule:

JUNE 2

  1. 8-9pm: Jeff Tweedy
  2. 9-10pm: Michael Arndt
  3. 10-11pm: Sara Levine
  4. 11pm-12am: Joe Gondolfi

JUNE 3

  1. 12am-1am: Elizabeth King
  2. 1am-2am: Danielle Meijer
  3. 2am-3am: Sean Kirkland
  4. 3am-4am: Rick Lee
  5. 4am-5am: Tristan Fischl
  6. 5am-6am: Logan Breitbart
  7. 6am-7am: Evan Edwards
  8. 7am-8am: Casey Hudetz
  9. 8am-9am: Shailja Sharma
  10. 9am-10am: Julie Moody-Freeman
  11. 10am-11am: Anna Vaughn Clissold
  12. 11am-12pm: Maryse Meijer
  13. 12pm-1pm: Lindsay Hunter
  14. 1pm-2pm: Jesse Eisenberg (via remote from NYC)
  15. 2pm-3pm: Kevin Madden
  16. 3pm-4pm: Christian TeBordo
  17. 4pm-5pm: Adam Levin
  18. 5pm-6pm: Lucy Rinehart
  19. 6pm-7pm: SPECIAL SURPRISE GUEST READER
  20. 7pm-8pm: George Saunders, “Why the Humanities? Why Art?”

Following the 24-hour marathon, The New Yorker will be publishing Saunders’ lecture to us. You will also be able to watch highlights from the marathon as well as all of Saunders’ address on the DePaul Humanities Center’s YouTube channel.

If you are on Twitter, you can follow us @DPU_Hum_Ctr

We are using #24hrsaunders to promote the event.

24 HOUR GEORGE SAUNDERS

WHEN

June 2 at 8 p.m. until June 3 at 8 p.m.

WHERE

DePaul University’s Lincoln Park Campus

Student Center, Room 120

2250 N Sheffield Ave.

This event is free and open to the public. Seating will be on a first-come, first-served basis throughout the 24-hour reading, and capacity will be limited.

WHO

George Saunders is a New York Times bestselling author who is known for his collections of short stories. His works include Congratulations, By the Way, Tenth of December, and CivilWarLand in Bad Decline. Born in Amarillo, Texas, Saunders grew up in the south suburbs of Chicago. He earned a degree in exploration geophysics from the Colorado School of Mines. After spending time as a geophysicist on the Indonesian island of Sumatra, Saunders returned to the United States to pursue a writing career. In 1992, his short story “Offloading for Mrs. Schwartz” became the first of many of his works that would be published in The New Yorker. In 2001, Saunders was selected by Entertainment Weekly as one of the 100 most creative people in entertainment, and by The New Yorker in 2002 as one of the best writers 40 and under. In 2006, he was awarded both a Guggenheim Fellowship and a MacArthur “genius grant” Fellowship. In 2009, he received an Arts and Letters Award in literature (formerly Academy Award) from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Saunders earned a master’s degree from Syracuse University, where he has been teaching in the Master of Fine Arts program since 1996.

More information on George Saunders here.


GUEST READER BIOS

June 2

  • Jeff Tweedy, 8-9 p.m. The singer, songwriter and producer will help open the event. Best known for the bands Wilco and Uncle Tupelo, Tweedy is currently touring with his son Spencer in their band, Tweedy.
  • Michael Arndt, 9-10 p.m. Editor of Crain’s Chicago Business, Arndt was previously senior editor and writer at BusinessWeek and business editor at the Chicago Tribune.
  • Sara Levine, 10-11 p.m. Levine is the Chicago-based author of numerous essays, the novel Treasure Island!!! and the short story collection Short Dark Oracles. Levine teaches in the writing program at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

June 3

  • Lindsay Hunter, 12-1 p.m. Hunter is the author of Ugly Girls as well as the collections of short stories Daddy’s and Don’t Kiss Me. She is originally from Florida and currently lives in Chicago.
  • Jesse Eisenberg, 1-2 p.m. Eisenberg is an Academy Award-nominated actor who is best known for his starring role as Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg in the film “The Social Network.” He has also starred in “Zombieland,” “30 Minutes or Less,” and “Now You See Me.” He will be portraying Superman villain Lex Luthor in next year’s “Batman vs. Superman: Dawn of Justice.”
  • Kevin Madden, 2-3 p.m. Madden is the Defense Intelligence Agency Chair at the United States Air Force Air University, and a professor at U.S. Air Force Air War College.
  • Christian TeBordo, 3-4 p.m. TeBordo is an author and director of the Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing program at Roosevelt University. His most well-known work is the short story collection The Awful Possibilities, which was nominated as an American Library Association Notable Book and received accolades from Publishers Weekly and Booklist.
  • Adam Levin, 4-5 p.m. Levin is an author well known for his short story collection Hot Pink and the novel The Instructions. Levin teaches Creative Writing and Literature at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Questions? Contact Alecia Person, DHC Office Manager, at aperson@depaul.edu.

The DePaul Humanities Center presents 24 Hour George Saunders June 2-3, 2015

The DePaul Humanities Center is  proud to present an amazing event featuring New York Times bestselling author George Saunders! 24 Hour George Saunders is a marathon 23-hour reading out loud of everything Saunders has ever published (with 23 special guest readers) that concludes at 7pm on June 3 when Saunders delivers a new lecture on the future and the importance of the arts and humanities in higher education and in our culture.

See the event flyer below for more details!

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“Building Characters to Last” Master Class with Patrick Hicks on April 20th

Writer Patrick Hicks will be giving a reading on April 20th, 2015, which we recently posted about here. The Department of English is excited to announce that in addition to his reading (4/20 at 6 p.m. in Richardson 115) Patrick will be giving a master class titled “Building Characters to Last” that is open to all English students—no permission required. The class will be at 4 p.m. in the 3rd Floor conference room of ALH. Students can contact Professor Johns-Trissler at rjohnstr@depaul.edu with any questions.

Patrick Hicks’s The Commandant of Lubizec is a harrowing account of a death camp that never actually existed but easily could have in the Nazi state. It is a sensitive, accurate retelling of a place that went about the business of genocide. Told as a historical account in a documentary style, it explores the atmosphere of a death camp. It describes what it was like to watch the trains roll in, and it probes into the mind of its commandant, Hans-Peter Guth. How could he murder thousands of people each day and then go home to laugh with his children? This is not only an unflinching portrayal of the machinery of the gas chambers, it is also the story of how prisoners burned the camp to the ground and fled into the woods. It is a story of rebellion and survival. It is a story of life amid death.

This is a vividly detailed, terrifying, convincing, and completely spellbinding story rooted in those murderous events we now call the Holocaust. It is also the story of a loving, good-humored family man who each morning goes off to oversee mass homicide — a dramatic example of what Hannah Arendt once referred to as ‘the banality of evil.’  Patrick Hicks has accomplished a very difficult literary task. He has given a believable and fresh and original face to barbarism. What a fine book this is.”

– Tim O’Brien, author of The Things They Carried,
winner of the National Book Award

Glass Mountain Seeks Undergraduate Student Writing! (Deadline 3/2/15)

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Glass Mountain invites undergraduate students to submit high-quality poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, art and reviews for publication in the upcoming issue of Glass Mountain Magazine, the undergraduate literary magazine at the University of Houston.

The journal is an award-winning, international platform for the voices of emerging writers and artists.  We are based out of the University of Houston’s Department of English, and the magazine is run entirely by undergraduate students.

For the Spring 2015 Issue, submit by March 2nd and have the issue in hand by April!

Your students’ best work can find a home online or in print at Glass Mountain. Graphic fiction?  Prose poetry? Music reviews? For specifics on submissions, see here.

This is an unusual opportunity for undergraduate writers. Glass Mountain is produced twice per year and especially needs submissions for the Spring Issue. For further details visit the magazine’s Submittable page.

Questions? Please email glassmountaineditors@gmail.com.

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“A Life to Spare”: AQ14 Short Fiction from Andra Roventa

“A Life to Spare” by Andra Roventa


Berthold Pfeiffer bit savagely against the inside of his cheek to keep from grimacing at the sight before him. Dozens of corpses lay strewn in the filthy, rat-infested gutters of Dresden, many of them fresh and still saturated with blood and smeared guts. Pairs of glassy, vacant eyes watched him with accusing looks, silently screaming at him to divulge why they had been thrown into the street like used garbage. Try as he might, Berthold was unable to tear his gaze away from the pile of once-breathing, once-walking Jews that were now no more than slabs of bullet-filled meat.

Some of them were alive merely ten minutes ago, he thought in bewilderment, eyeing a bearded rabbi whose mouth was still agape, rigid and distorted. He must have died screaming. The 21-year-old S.S. officer shuddered, finally averting his eyes from that haunting, empty stare the deceased rabbi managed to give him.

A portly, bald commander cleared his throat as he watched two remaining officers drag what seemed to be the last body from the demolished apartment complex the S.S. men were loitering against. The German duo dumped the lifeless body of a teenage boy onto the rest before turning to salute their commanding officer.

“Is that all of them, then?” the rotund, elderly commander known as Jorgen Fitzgerald, inquired in a voice laden with irritation. It looked like he had other business elsewhere, and this “menial” task was not one of them.

One of the Germans who had discarded the final Jew gave a half-assed shrug. “You know these Jews, Herr Fitzgerald. Sneaky little devils. There might be a couple here and there hiding about—under the floorboards, behind a secret stairwell. You can never be too sure with them.”

The fat commander gave a snort, nodding in agreement. “Disgusting vermin, the lot of them.” He bent his rhino-like head to rest on his decorated breast, pondering for a moment. “Right, then. I’m late for a dinner party as it is. Someone needs to run through the perimeters to make sure we’ve taken care of every last one of them. I don’t want any runaways or it’s going to look messy on my part.”

He clasped his hands against his bulging belly, scrutinizing the ten-or-so soldiers that encircled him. Fitzgerald scanned each of them before narrowing his beady eyes on Berthold. The latter bristled but kept his surprise in check.

“Pfeiffer. You’ve been quiet today, boy. I don’t recall you doing much when we stormed the complex,” Fitzgerald barked at the blond man, furrowing his brow in contemplation. “Give me your rifle.” His fingers, which looked more like fat sausages than digits, impatiently wiggled as he reached out for the weapon his subordinate had strapped to his shoulder.

Continue reading ““A Life to Spare”: AQ14 Short Fiction from Andra Roventa”

Luminarts Cultural Foundation Creative Writing Competition Now Accepting Applications (deadline June 1, 2015)

**While the deadline for this competition is somewhat far off, we’d like to call you attention to it now and will repost during Spring Quarter.

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Luminarts is now accepting applications
for the 2015 Creative Writing Competition!

The Creative Writing Competition awards five $5,000 grant awards and Luminarts Fellowships across categories of creative nonfiction, fiction, and poetry.

Entries are submitted to the competition and reviewed by an initial panel of jurors. Once tallied, all top entries go to the final juror panel and the winners are selected.

Jurors are comprised of professional authors, novelists, and American poets, literary contributors, publishers, editors, journalists and media contributors, and Pulitzer and PEN Hemingway Award Winners.

Head over to the Luminarts Creative Writing homepage to learn more. Submission guidelines and eligibility requirements can be found here.

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The Chicago Reader is Accepting Submissions for the 2014 PURE FICTION Issue (deadline 11/15)

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In January, the Reader will publish its 15th annual Pure Fiction issue, a collection of short stories submitted by mostly local fiction writers paired with illustrations by mostly local artists. This year, they’ll take submissions until November 15.

Here’s last year’s issue, with the winning stories selected by guest curator Barrie Jean Borich, author of Body Geographic, editor of the literary journal Slag Glass City, and a DePaul University faculty member.

Please send submissions to fiction@chicagoreader.com. We’re reasonably flexible on length, but up to 3,000 words is preferred. Multiple submissions are accepted. We pay for those we publish.

And if you are published, you’ll join the ranks of some exceptional writers. Our fiction issue archive includes pieces by Gina FrangelloBen GreenmanJonathan MessingerAnne Elizabeth Moore, and even some in-house Reader talent—Tony AdlerJ.R. Jones, and Philip Montoro.

MORE INFO HERE.

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