Chasing Wilder in Chicago: Thornton Wilder’s The Eighth Day

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The Wilder Family and The Newberry Library present “Chasing Wilder in Chicago: Thornton Wilder’s The Eighth Day” on

Wednesday, November 15 at 5 PM
Ruggles Hall at the Newberry Library
60 W Walton St, Chicago, IL 60610

This 50th anniversary celebration of Wilder’s National Book Award-winning, Chicago-based novel will feature a conversation with Thornton Wilder’s nephew and literary executor Tappan Wilder, Jeremy McCarter and Liesl Olson; readings from the novel by professional Chicago-area actors; and cake!  The event starts at 5pm with a reception and it’s all free and open to the public. Reservations are recommended.

Learn more!

Which Way Forward?: Freedom Organizing in the 21st Century

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“Which Way Forward?: Freedom Organizing in the Twenty-First Century”

An Event Featuring Leading Black Feminist Scholar and Organizer, Barbara Smith

Wednesday, January 18, 2017
6:00-8:00 pm, with reception.

SAC 154 (2320 N. Kenmore)

Author, activist, and independent scholar, Barbara Smith is a groundbreaker in opening up a national cultural and political dialogue about the intersections of race, class, sexuality, and gender. She was a cofounder of the Combahee River Collective, a Black feminist organization of the 1970s, and a cofounder and publisher of Kitchen Table: Women of Color Press (until 1995), the first U. S. publisher for women of color.

A collection of her essays, The Truth That Never Hurts: Writings on Race, Gender, and Freedom was published by Rutgers University Press in 1998. And in 2014, Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around: Forty Years of Movement Building with Barbara Smith, edited by Alethia Jones and Virginia Eubanks with Barbara Smith, was published by SUNY Press.

She is editor of three major collections: Conditions: Five, The Black Women’s Issue (with Lorraine Bethel, 1979); All the Women Are White, All the Blacks Are Men, But Some of Us Are Brave: Black Women’s Studies (with Gloria T. Hull and Patricia Bell Scott, 1982); and Home Girls: A Black Feminist Anthology, 1983. She is also the co-author with Elly Bulkin and Minnie Bruce Pratt of Yours in Struggle: Three Feminist Perspectives on Anti-Semitism and Racism, 1984. She is the general editor of The Reader’s Companion to U.S. Women’s History with Wilma Mankiller, Gwendolyn Mink, Marysa Navarro, and Gloria Steinem, 1998.

She resides in Albany, New York and served two terms as a member of the Albany Common Council from 2006 to 2013. Currently she is the Special Community Projects Coordinator for the City of Albany responsible for the Equity Agenda. She is a regular panelist on WAMC Northeast Public Radio’s Round Table.

This event is co-organized by Women’s and Gender Studies, the Center for Black Diaspora, the Women’s Center, the African and Black Diaspora Studies Program, with generous and much appreciated support from a growing number of cosponsors including the Critical Ethnic Studies and the LGBTQ Studies Programs, the Departments of English, Geography, and Latin American/Latino Studies Program.

Big Shoulders Books Presents: Literary Citizenship and the Power of Collaborative Storytelling, Tuesday April 19 at DPAM

Big Shoulders Books, a new publishing venture whose goal is to produce quality works of writing by and about Chicagoans whose lives might not otherwise be shared, invites the DePaul English community to a discussion with the amazing writers/editors Audrey Petty, Peter Orner and Michele Morano. The event, “Literary Citizenship and the Power of Collaborative Storytelling,” takes place at 6 p.m. at the DePaul Art Museum, 935 W. Fullerton (next to the Fullerton Red Line stop).

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Named the 2013 Chicagoan of the Year in literature by the Chicago Tribune, Audrey is the editor of the oral-history collection High Rise Stories: Voices of Chicago Public Housing.

An acclaimed novelist and short-story writer, Peter is the editor of two oral-history collections, including Underground America: Narratives of Undocumented Lives.
 
Michele Morano is the author of Grammar Lessons: Translating Life in Spain and serves as the director of the MAWP here at DePaul. 
 

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Spring Quarter Kicks Off, John Shanahan & Team Awarded $75K NEH Grant, Spring Conference (and Why You Should Submit*), and a Ton of Great Events

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Greetings, Undergrounders! We hope your first week of spring quarter is progressing well. April is practically here and we can’t wait for the inevitable new blooms, outside lectures (if we’re lucky!) and warm, sunny days. Hopefully not too sunny, though, or else it’ll be hard to stay inside and study.

Some amazing news for the DePaul English department, and the humanities in general, arrived over spring break!

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John Shanahan, associate dean of LAS and associate professor of English, and co-principal investigators Robin Burke (CDM – Computing), Antonio Ceraso (WRD) and Megan Bernal (DePaul Library) have been awarded a $75,000 grant by the NEH (National Endowment for the Humanities) Office of Digital Humanities for their project “Reading Chicago Reading: Modeling Texts and Readers in a Public Library System.” Shanahan insideThe project is briefly described as “a pilot study on how analyzing patron responses to a citywide reading program can help scholars and librarians better understand which book genres and styles prove most meaningful to the community.” Given that DePaul has long been a partner of the CPL’s One Book, One Chicago program, it seems like an especially great proposal.               Congrats to Prof. Shanahan and the team!

Speaking of the Humanities, the DePaul Humanities Center has a spring calendar that looks full of amazing literary-themed events. Here’s a sneak preview:

Wednesday, April 6
Humanities Center Event: DePaulywood Squares (featuring ENG professor ANne CLark Batlett!)
7:00 – 9:00 pm
Student Center 120
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Monday, April 11
Humanities Center Event: Making the Novel Novel, Moby Dick
7:00 – 9:00 pm
Student Center 120

Thursday, April 21
Making the Novel Novel: The XenoText
7:00 – 9:00 pm
Student Center 120

We’ll be keeping you updated on these and the other events when they come around. Last but certainly not least, the Spring English Conference is almost here. Send us your Academic or Creative Work and participate in a day of panels and talks held on Friday, April 9th. Email englishconference.dpu(at)gmail.com with questions and submissions. 

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*Are you wondering what all the conference fuss is about? Worry not – we’re here to explain.

Here’s the deal. It’s a day each spring organized by two grad students (yours truly included)  to gather the grad and undergrad students in the English Department and discuss and share our work. As ENG students, we spend hours and hours and devote ourselves to the study and writing of literature and creative work – this is your chance to hear what your classmates work on and present your own papers and projects. It’s great experience for graduate work, postgrad work, and (GASP) your impending professional life, where you will quite often be required to present your ideas and work in a compelling and confident way. (It’s true in ANY line of work. Believe me.)

We group the submissions by theme, so you’d be presenting your work alongside other similar work. If you write fiction, poetry, or nonfiction, you’ll be reading it aloud and talking about the creative process along with other similar presenters.If you have an idea, but it’s not done yet, you can submit a proposal. See the 2016 SPEC Submission Guidelines for details.*

ASK Networking Event: Coffee & Chill on Tuesday, February 17th

The ASK (Alumni Sharing Knowledge) network at DePaul welcomes all LAS students to a social event called Coffee & Chill that will take place Wednesday, February 17th, in Arts & Letters Hall Rm 102. The ASK network is a great resource that makes alumni mentors available to students in order to share their experiences, career trajectories, and other useful knowledge. Speaking with people who have liberal arts degrees is a great way to understand the wealth of possibilities available to LAS students!

Coffee & Chill is a relaxed, casual event that is meant to help students become familiar with ASK and ASK mentors. There will be coffee and refreshments. All LAS students are welcome!

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TONIGHT! 24-Hour George Saunders!

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Please join the DePaul Humanities Center and the Office of the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences for a special event investigating the future of the humanities.

From 8:00 p.m. June 2 until 8:00 p.m. June 3, the DePaul Humanities Center will be hosting “24 Hour George Saunders,” a marathon, public reading of everything that best-selling author and MacArthur “genius grant” winner George Saunders has ever published, culminating in a new lecture by Saunders in the final hour entitled, “Why the Humanities? Why Art?” Celebrity readers include Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy, Academy Awardâ nominee Jesse Eisenberg, and a special surprise guest reader in the penultimate hour. Other DePaul faculty and students–as well as Chicago artists, authors, scholars, and celebrities–will also be reading for an hour according to the following schedule:

JUNE 2

  1. 8-9pm: Jeff Tweedy
  2. 9-10pm: Michael Arndt
  3. 10-11pm: Sara Levine
  4. 11pm-12am: Joe Gondolfi

JUNE 3

  1. 12am-1am: Elizabeth King
  2. 1am-2am: Danielle Meijer
  3. 2am-3am: Sean Kirkland
  4. 3am-4am: Rick Lee
  5. 4am-5am: Tristan Fischl
  6. 5am-6am: Logan Breitbart
  7. 6am-7am: Evan Edwards
  8. 7am-8am: Casey Hudetz
  9. 8am-9am: Shailja Sharma
  10. 9am-10am: Julie Moody-Freeman
  11. 10am-11am: Anna Vaughn Clissold
  12. 11am-12pm: Maryse Meijer
  13. 12pm-1pm: Lindsay Hunter
  14. 1pm-2pm: Jesse Eisenberg (via remote from NYC)
  15. 2pm-3pm: Kevin Madden
  16. 3pm-4pm: Christian TeBordo
  17. 4pm-5pm: Adam Levin
  18. 5pm-6pm: Lucy Rinehart
  19. 6pm-7pm: SPECIAL SURPRISE GUEST READER
  20. 7pm-8pm: George Saunders, “Why the Humanities? Why Art?”

Following the 24-hour marathon, The New Yorker will be publishing Saunders’ lecture to us. You will also be able to watch highlights from the marathon as well as all of Saunders’ address on the DePaul Humanities Center’s YouTube channel.

If you are on Twitter, you can follow us @DPU_Hum_Ctr

We are using #24hrsaunders to promote the event.

24 HOUR GEORGE SAUNDERS

WHEN

June 2 at 8 p.m. until June 3 at 8 p.m.

WHERE

DePaul University’s Lincoln Park Campus

Student Center, Room 120

2250 N Sheffield Ave.

This event is free and open to the public. Seating will be on a first-come, first-served basis throughout the 24-hour reading, and capacity will be limited.

WHO

George Saunders is a New York Times bestselling author who is known for his collections of short stories. His works include Congratulations, By the Way, Tenth of December, and CivilWarLand in Bad Decline. Born in Amarillo, Texas, Saunders grew up in the south suburbs of Chicago. He earned a degree in exploration geophysics from the Colorado School of Mines. After spending time as a geophysicist on the Indonesian island of Sumatra, Saunders returned to the United States to pursue a writing career. In 1992, his short story “Offloading for Mrs. Schwartz” became the first of many of his works that would be published in The New Yorker. In 2001, Saunders was selected by Entertainment Weekly as one of the 100 most creative people in entertainment, and by The New Yorker in 2002 as one of the best writers 40 and under. In 2006, he was awarded both a Guggenheim Fellowship and a MacArthur “genius grant” Fellowship. In 2009, he received an Arts and Letters Award in literature (formerly Academy Award) from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Saunders earned a master’s degree from Syracuse University, where he has been teaching in the Master of Fine Arts program since 1996.

More information on George Saunders here.


GUEST READER BIOS

June 2

  • Jeff Tweedy, 8-9 p.m. The singer, songwriter and producer will help open the event. Best known for the bands Wilco and Uncle Tupelo, Tweedy is currently touring with his son Spencer in their band, Tweedy.
  • Michael Arndt, 9-10 p.m. Editor of Crain’s Chicago Business, Arndt was previously senior editor and writer at BusinessWeek and business editor at the Chicago Tribune.
  • Sara Levine, 10-11 p.m. Levine is the Chicago-based author of numerous essays, the novel Treasure Island!!! and the short story collection Short Dark Oracles. Levine teaches in the writing program at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

June 3

  • Lindsay Hunter, 12-1 p.m. Hunter is the author of Ugly Girls as well as the collections of short stories Daddy’s and Don’t Kiss Me. She is originally from Florida and currently lives in Chicago.
  • Jesse Eisenberg, 1-2 p.m. Eisenberg is an Academy Award-nominated actor who is best known for his starring role as Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg in the film “The Social Network.” He has also starred in “Zombieland,” “30 Minutes or Less,” and “Now You See Me.” He will be portraying Superman villain Lex Luthor in next year’s “Batman vs. Superman: Dawn of Justice.”
  • Kevin Madden, 2-3 p.m. Madden is the Defense Intelligence Agency Chair at the United States Air Force Air University, and a professor at U.S. Air Force Air War College.
  • Christian TeBordo, 3-4 p.m. TeBordo is an author and director of the Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing program at Roosevelt University. His most well-known work is the short story collection The Awful Possibilities, which was nominated as an American Library Association Notable Book and received accolades from Publishers Weekly and Booklist.
  • Adam Levin, 4-5 p.m. Levin is an author well known for his short story collection Hot Pink and the novel The Instructions. Levin teaches Creative Writing and Literature at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Questions? Contact Alecia Person, DHC Office Manager, at aperson@depaul.edu.