The 100th Anniversary of the Russian Revolution

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Wednesday, November 8 from 7-9 PM
DePaul Student Center, room 120
2250 N Sheffield Avenue, Chicago

In November of 1917, Bolshevik workers and soldiers successfully overthrew the provisional government that had been established in Russia only eight months earlier following the dissolution of the Tsarist autocracy. Under the guidance of Vladimir Lenin, the Marxist revolution promised land for the peasants, power for the workers, and food for the poor.

A century later, the DePaul Humanities Center examines these promises and explores some of the methods the revolutionaries devised to fulfill them. Putting theory into practice in an evening devoted to a radical questioning of the hierarchies of public gatherings and academic institutions, ideas will be presented, but the audience will be invited to participate by making the ideas their own, considering how best to give them power.

Featuring live music, performance, theatre, a world-premiere film by Our Literal Speed, and reports on Party work (Helena Goscilo on the Women’s Section, and William Nickell on the challenges of cultural transformation) our participatory assembly—our “soviet”—will think together about the positive aspects of the revolution, what its spirit represented, and what we might learn from it given our situation today.

Spring Quarter Kicks Off, John Shanahan & Team Awarded $75K NEH Grant, Spring Conference (and Why You Should Submit*), and a Ton of Great Events

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image by rawpixel.com

Greetings, Undergrounders! We hope your first week of spring quarter is progressing well. April is practically here and we can’t wait for the inevitable new blooms, outside lectures (if we’re lucky!) and warm, sunny days. Hopefully not too sunny, though, or else it’ll be hard to stay inside and study.

Some amazing news for the DePaul English department, and the humanities in general, arrived over spring break!

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John Shanahan, associate dean of LAS and associate professor of English, and co-principal investigators Robin Burke (CDM – Computing), Antonio Ceraso (WRD) and Megan Bernal (DePaul Library) have been awarded a $75,000 grant by the NEH (National Endowment for the Humanities) Office of Digital Humanities for their project “Reading Chicago Reading: Modeling Texts and Readers in a Public Library System.” Shanahan insideThe project is briefly described as “a pilot study on how analyzing patron responses to a citywide reading program can help scholars and librarians better understand which book genres and styles prove most meaningful to the community.” Given that DePaul has long been a partner of the CPL’s One Book, One Chicago program, it seems like an especially great proposal.               Congrats to Prof. Shanahan and the team!

Speaking of the Humanities, the DePaul Humanities Center has a spring calendar that looks full of amazing literary-themed events. Here’s a sneak preview:

Wednesday, April 6
Humanities Center Event: DePaulywood Squares (featuring ENG professor ANne CLark Batlett!)
7:00 – 9:00 pm
Student Center 120
DePaulywood Squares
Monday, April 11
Humanities Center Event: Making the Novel Novel, Moby Dick
7:00 – 9:00 pm
Student Center 120

Thursday, April 21
Making the Novel Novel: The XenoText
7:00 – 9:00 pm
Student Center 120

We’ll be keeping you updated on these and the other events when they come around. Last but certainly not least, the Spring English Conference is almost here. Send us your Academic or Creative Work and participate in a day of panels and talks held on Friday, April 9th. Email englishconference.dpu(at)gmail.com with questions and submissions. 

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*Are you wondering what all the conference fuss is about? Worry not – we’re here to explain.

Here’s the deal. It’s a day each spring organized by two grad students (yours truly included)  to gather the grad and undergrad students in the English Department and discuss and share our work. As ENG students, we spend hours and hours and devote ourselves to the study and writing of literature and creative work – this is your chance to hear what your classmates work on and present your own papers and projects. It’s great experience for graduate work, postgrad work, and (GASP) your impending professional life, where you will quite often be required to present your ideas and work in a compelling and confident way. (It’s true in ANY line of work. Believe me.)

We group the submissions by theme, so you’d be presenting your work alongside other similar work. If you write fiction, poetry, or nonfiction, you’ll be reading it aloud and talking about the creative process along with other similar presenters.If you have an idea, but it’s not done yet, you can submit a proposal. See the 2016 SPEC Submission Guidelines for details.*

DePaul Humanities Center Presents “Making the Novel Novel: Lolita”, Wednesday Jan. 20, 2016

The DePaul Humanities Center continues its radical re-thinking of novels by turning its attention to Vladimir Nabokov’s classic, Lolita. The evening begins with the world premiere of “Young Matrix, Unknown Heart,” adapted for the stage from Nobakov’s novel by Dan Christmann, and performed and directed by Evan Hill and Melissa Lorraine. The performance including author Maryse Meijer, Danielle Meijer (DePaul University), and Shari L. Savage (Ohio State University), will investigate the various artwork used as book covers for Lolita and the complicated ways in which Lolita’s age may not be really the central moral question of the novel.

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A discounted parking rate is available. See Humanities Center staff at event for details.

Slag Glass City Pop-Up Mini-Memoir Event This Sunday, June 7, at the Comfort Station in Logan Square

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Slag Glass City INVITES all Chicagoans to

Write ON Chicago/ HERE is WHERE

on Sunday 7 June. Drop in between Noon and 4:00 PM at

THE COMFORT STATION in Logan Square

2579 N Milwaukee Ave.

Write ON Chicago is a free pop-up creative writing event inviting you to document your Chicago-based memories by completing the phrase “HERE is where________.”

Participants will write their mini-memoirs on sticky notes and affix them to one of our large city maps, helping us create a living portrait of this city of memory, reinvention, and dream.

HERE is where you received a life-changing phone call.
HERE is where you lost your way on an unfamiliar street.
HERE is where you made your life better, or worse.
HERE is where you proposed to your beloved.
HERE is where you entered or exited the train.
HERE is where you cleaned up a mess and made yourself at home.

• ACCORDION MUSIC by Chicago theater artist Ruth Margraff.

• READINGS of brand new flash memoirs by Chicago writing students, on the topic of BECOMING.

• RECITATIONS of moments of wonder from CLASSIC CHICAGO LITERATURE.

• Free Chicago-made CANDY and Chicago-made LITERARY MAGAZINES.

Screenshot 2015-05-26 17.13.49AVAILABLE at this event for the FIRST TIME EVER is the premier publication in our new print series Slag Glass City Miniatures: Big Cities. Little Books.  This first edition is called IT IS NOT WASTE ALL THIS  (after the title of an essay in the compilation by Chicago author Kathleen Rooney).  The book is itty,  bitty, and pretty. Come get yours!

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Write ON Chicago urges us to consider the vital role city spaces play in our lives—open or dense, green or concrete, struggling or thriving, and everything in-between. By humanizing the city map with our stories, we hope to reveal ways our city might at once persevere and be remade.

THE COMFORT STATION—an historic municipal building re-purposed as an art gallery and performance space—is located right off Logan Square and easily accessible from the #74 Fullerton bus, the #76 Diversey bus, and the #56 Milwaukee bus, as well as the Logan Square Blue Line stop, and the event is happening during the weekly farmer’s market on Logan Boulevard.

Support for this event comes from the DePaul University Department of English and the DePaul Humanities Center.

TONIGHT! 24-Hour George Saunders!

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Please join the DePaul Humanities Center and the Office of the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences for a special event investigating the future of the humanities.

From 8:00 p.m. June 2 until 8:00 p.m. June 3, the DePaul Humanities Center will be hosting “24 Hour George Saunders,” a marathon, public reading of everything that best-selling author and MacArthur “genius grant” winner George Saunders has ever published, culminating in a new lecture by Saunders in the final hour entitled, “Why the Humanities? Why Art?” Celebrity readers include Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy, Academy Awardâ nominee Jesse Eisenberg, and a special surprise guest reader in the penultimate hour. Other DePaul faculty and students–as well as Chicago artists, authors, scholars, and celebrities–will also be reading for an hour according to the following schedule:

JUNE 2

  1. 8-9pm: Jeff Tweedy
  2. 9-10pm: Michael Arndt
  3. 10-11pm: Sara Levine
  4. 11pm-12am: Joe Gondolfi

JUNE 3

  1. 12am-1am: Elizabeth King
  2. 1am-2am: Danielle Meijer
  3. 2am-3am: Sean Kirkland
  4. 3am-4am: Rick Lee
  5. 4am-5am: Tristan Fischl
  6. 5am-6am: Logan Breitbart
  7. 6am-7am: Evan Edwards
  8. 7am-8am: Casey Hudetz
  9. 8am-9am: Shailja Sharma
  10. 9am-10am: Julie Moody-Freeman
  11. 10am-11am: Anna Vaughn Clissold
  12. 11am-12pm: Maryse Meijer
  13. 12pm-1pm: Lindsay Hunter
  14. 1pm-2pm: Jesse Eisenberg (via remote from NYC)
  15. 2pm-3pm: Kevin Madden
  16. 3pm-4pm: Christian TeBordo
  17. 4pm-5pm: Adam Levin
  18. 5pm-6pm: Lucy Rinehart
  19. 6pm-7pm: SPECIAL SURPRISE GUEST READER
  20. 7pm-8pm: George Saunders, “Why the Humanities? Why Art?”

Following the 24-hour marathon, The New Yorker will be publishing Saunders’ lecture to us. You will also be able to watch highlights from the marathon as well as all of Saunders’ address on the DePaul Humanities Center’s YouTube channel.

If you are on Twitter, you can follow us @DPU_Hum_Ctr

We are using #24hrsaunders to promote the event.

24 HOUR GEORGE SAUNDERS

WHEN

June 2 at 8 p.m. until June 3 at 8 p.m.

WHERE

DePaul University’s Lincoln Park Campus

Student Center, Room 120

2250 N Sheffield Ave.

This event is free and open to the public. Seating will be on a first-come, first-served basis throughout the 24-hour reading, and capacity will be limited.

WHO

George Saunders is a New York Times bestselling author who is known for his collections of short stories. His works include Congratulations, By the Way, Tenth of December, and CivilWarLand in Bad Decline. Born in Amarillo, Texas, Saunders grew up in the south suburbs of Chicago. He earned a degree in exploration geophysics from the Colorado School of Mines. After spending time as a geophysicist on the Indonesian island of Sumatra, Saunders returned to the United States to pursue a writing career. In 1992, his short story “Offloading for Mrs. Schwartz” became the first of many of his works that would be published in The New Yorker. In 2001, Saunders was selected by Entertainment Weekly as one of the 100 most creative people in entertainment, and by The New Yorker in 2002 as one of the best writers 40 and under. In 2006, he was awarded both a Guggenheim Fellowship and a MacArthur “genius grant” Fellowship. In 2009, he received an Arts and Letters Award in literature (formerly Academy Award) from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Saunders earned a master’s degree from Syracuse University, where he has been teaching in the Master of Fine Arts program since 1996.

More information on George Saunders here.


GUEST READER BIOS

June 2

  • Jeff Tweedy, 8-9 p.m. The singer, songwriter and producer will help open the event. Best known for the bands Wilco and Uncle Tupelo, Tweedy is currently touring with his son Spencer in their band, Tweedy.
  • Michael Arndt, 9-10 p.m. Editor of Crain’s Chicago Business, Arndt was previously senior editor and writer at BusinessWeek and business editor at the Chicago Tribune.
  • Sara Levine, 10-11 p.m. Levine is the Chicago-based author of numerous essays, the novel Treasure Island!!! and the short story collection Short Dark Oracles. Levine teaches in the writing program at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

June 3

  • Lindsay Hunter, 12-1 p.m. Hunter is the author of Ugly Girls as well as the collections of short stories Daddy’s and Don’t Kiss Me. She is originally from Florida and currently lives in Chicago.
  • Jesse Eisenberg, 1-2 p.m. Eisenberg is an Academy Award-nominated actor who is best known for his starring role as Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg in the film “The Social Network.” He has also starred in “Zombieland,” “30 Minutes or Less,” and “Now You See Me.” He will be portraying Superman villain Lex Luthor in next year’s “Batman vs. Superman: Dawn of Justice.”
  • Kevin Madden, 2-3 p.m. Madden is the Defense Intelligence Agency Chair at the United States Air Force Air University, and a professor at U.S. Air Force Air War College.
  • Christian TeBordo, 3-4 p.m. TeBordo is an author and director of the Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing program at Roosevelt University. His most well-known work is the short story collection The Awful Possibilities, which was nominated as an American Library Association Notable Book and received accolades from Publishers Weekly and Booklist.
  • Adam Levin, 4-5 p.m. Levin is an author well known for his short story collection Hot Pink and the novel The Instructions. Levin teaches Creative Writing and Literature at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Questions? Contact Alecia Person, DHC Office Manager, at aperson@depaul.edu.

The DePaul Humanities Center presents 24 Hour George Saunders June 2-3, 2015

The DePaul Humanities Center is  proud to present an amazing event featuring New York Times bestselling author George Saunders! 24 Hour George Saunders is a marathon 23-hour reading out loud of everything Saunders has ever published (with 23 special guest readers) that concludes at 7pm on June 3 when Saunders delivers a new lecture on the future and the importance of the arts and humanities in higher education and in our culture.

See the event flyer below for more details!

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Ander Monson: Letter to a Future Book and Reader–February 11th, 2015, 7pm

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On Wednesday, February 11th (7:00-8:30 pm, in room 120 of the DePaul Student Center), join us for the inaugural event in the DePaul Humanities Center series –

Discards: The Future(s) of the Book and Library – by welcoming:

Ander Monson: Letter to a Future Book and Reader

Acclaimed poet, renowned author, and wildly inventive anarchic library patron, Ander Monson comes to DePaul’s Humanities Center to celebrate the publication of his groundbreaking book, Letter to a Future Lover, and to investigate what it means to be a reader, a writer, a book lover, and a library client.

Beginning the evening with Jessica Speer and an exploration of the nature of the archive (by means of puppetry), Monson will then offer a lecture and reading from his new work: a collection of index cards inspired by, and placed into, various library books around the world.  Sure to cause a popular and critical stir in 2015, Monson’s new work is a stunningly original, groundbreaking writing project that crosses all boundaries of fiction and nonfiction, reader and writer, modern and postmodern.  In celebration of the creative revolutionary energy of Monson’s work, at the end of the evening the audience will be invited to participate in a group writing and performative act that will change DePaul forever….

Join us for a special puppet-filled, index card-marked, interactive evening as we come together to reimagine the nature of an archive, a library, a printed idea, and the act of reading itself.