Event Review: Gothic and Horror Fiction Open Mic Night

20171030_164108
Hannah Cantafio reads at the Gothic & Horror Open Mic Night.

by Taylor Spies, contributor to the Underground

The Gamma Psi Chapter of Sigma Tau Delta, the National honor society for students majoring in English, held a Gothic and Horror Fiction Open Mic Night on the third floor of Arts and Letters Hall on Monday, October 30th at 6pm. The event was small, but the intimate environment was perfect for ghost stories.

Chapter President Bintou Sy began by greeting those that had gathered and introducing Associate Professor and Director of the Undergraduate Program, Jennifer Conary. Conary gave an overview of the origins of the gothic novel and how we interpret the genre today. It was easy to tell that Conary was passionate about her topic, and her warm voice invited the audience to become intrigued by the gothic, stating, “Gothic novels offer physical manifestations of psychological horrors or fears.”

The first reader, Hannah Cantafio, read a short story from the novel Haunted by Chuck Palahniuk, published in 2005. “Dog Years” follows a rich and mysterious wheelchair-bound man. Her words came quick and clear, painting the picture the author created.

The next reader was Assistant Director of Graduate Programs, Janet L. Hickey. Hickey read from The Book of Irish Weirdness by Mairtin O’Griofa, published in 1997. The book showcases short stories by well-known authors. Hickey read “The Judge’s House” by Bram Stoker. This was quite a step back in time as the story was originally published in 1891. However, the story had gotten no less eerie with age, and, followed a student renting out a house rumored to be haunted.

Assistant Professor Bill Johnson González read the next piece, a chapter from The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros, published in 1984, titled “Geraldo No Last Name.” This piece varied strikingly from the traditional Gothic. González expressed his attempt to find a piece of gothic writing by someone with a Latino or Hispanic background.

Associate Professor and Chair Michele Morano gave the final reading. She read excerpts from a short story by William Faulkner, published in 1930, titled “A Rose for Emily.” This story follows an eccentric lady whose behavior grows increasingly odd as she ages. She never marries, refuses to pay taxes, and dies in the same old house she was born in. It isn’t until after she has been buried that her house is investigated and the truth about her past comes out. The story’s shocking conclusion was the perfect ending to the night. The stories read drew the audience in. One became aware of Halloween’s approach, the dead leaves swirling outside, and the quickly growing darkness.

Advertisements

Course Spotlight: Grammar & Style

ENG211_GrammarandStyle

This course provides an examination of the elements of grammatical structure as they are employed to create stylistic effect in writing. The course begins with the structure of American English, including types of words, types of simple sentences, verb phrases and compounding. Attention then turns to transformations and other sources of complexity. Throughout the course, we will examine the use of the structures being studied as they are deployed and adapted by published authors. NOTE: This is not a remedial course in grammar; students entering the course should be familiar with the conventions of Standard Edited English. TTH 2:40-4:10

Course Spotlight: Irish Film & Literature

ENG275_irishfilmandliterature

EN 275 / IRE 204 Irish Literature & Film (W 6:00 – 9:15) seeks to examine works of Irish cinema in light of a selection of writings from major twentieth century Irish authors. Our study will begin with the writings of the Irish Revival and move on to contemporary works so as to establish a scholarly understanding of recent interpretations and adaptations of these materials. After addressing the fundamental questions regarding
how to study Irish narratives, we will go on to topical analysis of works dealing with central issues in Irish Studies and Irish cinema, including: the War of Independence and Civil War (Michael Collins, The Wind That Shakes The Barley); The Northern Irish Crisis / Anglo-Irish Relations (The Crying Game, The Boxer), urban life / dystopia (Adam & Paul, Intermission) and other topics as appropriate.

Call for Submissions: Oakland Arts Review

oakland-arts-review-vol-2

There’s still time for undergraduates to submit their poetry, nonfiction, fiction, comics, screenplays, and art to Oakland Arts Review!

The deadline has been extended until November 15, 2017.

OAR is an international magazine of undergraduate writing and art at Oakland University in Rochester, MI. Past issues and submission guidelines are available at www.oaklandartsreview.com.

The deadline has also been extended for The 2018 Hajja Razia Sharif Sheikh Prizes in Poetry and Nonfiction. Publication along with a $500 first prize and $300 second prize for the best essays and poems that address the experience of being Muslim in America. The author doesn’t have to be Muslim to enter and there is no entry fee.

Job Opportunity: Tutoring

adult-1868015_1920

Frog Tutoring now accepting applications for Chicago tutors.

All Frog Tutoring tutors will meet with assigned students to provide one-on-one private tutoring for subject matters in their areas of expertise. Tutors are to serve as a guide and coach to assist their students to become a successful, independent learner while integrating effective study and learning strategies to maximize the student’s potential for academic progress. Ultimately, it is the tutor’s responsibility to motivate students to want to learn, achieve, and be self-motivated.

Why Work For Frog Tutoring?
1. Flexibility
2. Tutors will choose which grade levels and subjects to tutor.
3. Tutors will create their own work schedule.
4. As long as tutors work the minimum amount of hours a week, they can work as many hours as they like.
5. Driving Compensation Depending on the distance, tutors will be compensated for driving over a certain mileage.
6. Bonuses Tutors who constantly receive high tutor rankings will be eligible for periodic bonuses.
7. Incentives & Acknowledgement (Hard work does not go unnoticed!!!)
8. Tutor of the month: Every month the Regional Coordinator from each region will submit one tutor to be selected as the tutor of the month. This tutor will have their name and photo posted on the corporate page of the website as well as our Facebook page. Not only will they receive public acknowledgement and a certificate, the tutor of the month will receive “special prize” which will vary each month.
9. Tutor Referral Program during our “busy” season
10. During times when there is a high need for tutors, current tutors will receive a bonus for every person referred and hired that are qualified to tutor in high demand subjects.

Apply online.

Call for Submissions: RipRap Literary Journal

submit-header

From the editors of RipRap Literary Journal:

RipRap Literary Journal Volume 40 would like to offer our humble invitation to talented writers and artists of all genres for our CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS! We are currently accepting submissions for Artwork, Poetry, Short Fiction, Flash Fiction, and Creative Nonfiction. There is no fee to submit. 

We will be accepting submissions until December 3, 2017. 

RipRap is a literary journal designed and produced annually by students in the Master of Fine Arts, Creative Writing program at California State University Long Beach (CSULB). RipRap highlights new and emerging writers from across the country as well as enlightening interviews of award winning, published writers who are featured in the CSULB English Department’s Visiting Writers Series or from the known writing community. New editions of the journal are published each May. Being the 40th anniversary edition, we would like to encourage submissions that illuminates the current unique social and political climate. As always with all our submissions, we seek out work that is innovative, forward-thinking, and as entertaining as it is thought-provoking.

Submit your work.

Course Spotlight: Introduction to Screenwriting

DC201 W18 flyer

This course is an introduction to and overview of the elements of theme, plot, character, and dialogue in dramatic writing for cinema. Emphasis is placed on telling a story in terms of action and the reality of characters. The difference between the literary and visual medium is explored through individual writing projects and group analysis. Development of synopsis and treatment for a short theatrical screen play: theme, plot, character, mise-en-scene and utilization of cinematic elements. Questions? Contact instructor Ben Kumming: bkumming@depaul.edu.