Event Review: Books on the Chopping Block with City Lit Theatre

By Olivia Muran
Contributor to The Underground

On Friday, September 27, DePaul celebrated Banned Books Week by hosting Books on the Chopping Block, a live performance by the City Lit Theater Company. The event kicked off at 1 p.m. in the John T. Richardson Library on DePaul’s Lincoln Park campus. Banned Books Week is an annual event hosted by the Office for Intellectual Freedom at the American Library Association. The event raises awareness of the censorship that seeks to dull the intellectual flame of readers across the nation. Regarding the dulling of said figurative flame, the theme of the event this year was “Censorship Leaves Us in the Dark,” urging everyone to “Keep the Light On.”

At DePaul, four members of the City Lit Theater Company performed selections from the Top 10 Banned Books on 2018’s list, including the Captain Underpants series by Dav Pilkey, The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas, and Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher. The list also featured many children’s picture books, such as Skippyjon Jones by Judy Schachner and A Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo by Jill Twiss. In order to make it on the Banned Books list, these titles must have multiple formal complaints or ‘challenges’ filed against them in an effort to remove access in libraries and schools nationwide. Six out of the ten books on the list were banned because of LGBTQIA+ content, while others were banned for addressing teen suicide or political viewpoints.

The performance selections featured a mix of comedy and serious content. Many of the passages read showcased the importance of the book at hand, advocating accessibility as well as removal from banned lists nationwide. For example, the number one challenged book of 2018 was George by Alex Gino, which tells the story of a transgender character during adolescence. The passage performed at DePaul showcased the book’s child-like innocence of George’s experience, though the topic is controversial among certain book communities. As a result, Gino’s George has been banned, challenged, and relocated from libraries and schools.

The Top Banned Books list serves to call our attention to the censorship that books face when the content presents controversial topics. By filing formal complaints, censors restrict access to diverse communities and decide which books can and cannot be read. In turn, participation and awareness of events like Books on the Chopping Block during Banned Books Week continues to defend these restricted books and works to “Keep the Light On” when “Censorship Keeps Us in the Dark.”

Native Son Special Events

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Don’t miss Native Son at the DePaul Theatre School! In 1930s South Side Chicago, Bigger Thomas lands a job with a wealthy white family but his fate is sealed when a violent act unleashes a chain of events that cannot be undone. This adaption of Richard Wright’s groundbreaking novel Native Son by Theatre School alumna Nambi E. Kelley explores the systemic racism and poverty that oppressed Bigger Thomas from birth.

Recommended for mature audiences.

More information.

 

iO Theater Internship

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iO Theater is seeking interns to help with producing and marketing at their Lincoln Park comedy theater. Students will be able to take on creative projects that interest them and set their own hours for college credit. If you’re interested in producing or marketing, please send your resume and a cover letter to Shelby Plummer at plummer@ioimprov.com and specify if you are interested in producing, marketing, or both.

If you are selected for this internship, contact Professor Chris Green at cgreen1@depaul.edu and he will register you for ENG 392, the online internship class, for Winter Quarter.

A Celebration of Gwendolyn Brooks

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This event will celebrates the life and works of Gwendolyn Brooks, one of the most well-celebrated poets of the 20th century. We will be hosting her biographer, Angela Jackson.

Angela will be discussing thie life and works of Gwendolyn Brooks. Additionally, DePaul Theater School Alums will read selected vignettes from Maud Martha. The only novel she ever wrote, this book tells the story of a young black girl growing up in Chicago.

Angela Jackson is an award-winning poet, playwright, and novelist. In her most recent book, A Surprised Queenhood in the New Black Sun, Jackson delves deep into the rich fabric of fellow poet and Chicagoan Gwendolyn Brooks’s work and world. Granted unprecedented access to Brooks’s family, personal papers, and writing community, Jackson traces the literary arc of this artist’s long career and gives context for the world in which Brooks wrote and published her work. It is a powerfully intimate look at a once-in-a-lifetime talent up close, using forty-three of Brooks’s most soul-stirring poems as a guide.

Learn more!

Some Reminders, Sweet Deals, and Upcoming Events

Here’s a quick reminder for you research-loving undergraduate students: the deadline to apply to the upcoming Newberry Library Undergraduate Seminar is tomorrow, Friday, October 18. Get those applications turned in ASAP!

The DePaul P.O.E.T.S. (or, as their close friends prefer to call them, Presenters of Enlightenment Through Spoken-Word) will be holding their very first open mic of the year on Monday, October 21 from 8:00 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. in the Brownstone’s Annex! Come and perform your own poetry, rap, music, and more — or just come and listen while the P.O.E.T.S. peeps spit some spoken-word magic. And did I mention there’s free food involved?

1.th_.th_.ve_.GoodmanTheatreAnd finally, as all of us DePaul students already know, Chicago is known for many awesome things, but two in particular come up again and again: Chicago is home to the world’s best pizza and a fantastic theatre scene. On Wednesday, October 23, the Goodman Theatre, one of Chicago’s absolute gems for live stage performances, is inviting college students to come and enjoy both — pizza and a play— for only $10 per ticket! From 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m., enjoy some Chicago pizza and pop in the Goodman’s 2nd floor lobby. Then, at 7:30, settle into your seats and enjoy the Goodman’s production of Pullman Porter BluesTake a music-fueled trip with back in time to the luxurious Pullman trains of the 1930s and see classic blues favorites like “Sweet Home Chicago” come to life with a live onstage band.

Don’t miss out on your chance to join the Goodman gang as the world-class theatre kicks-off its students-only 10Tix College Night season. Use promo code COLLEGE for online tickets or call the Goodman Theatre box office at 312.443.3800. A student ID must be presented at the event. For more information or to purchase your ticket, visit GoodmanTheatre.org/CollegeNight today!

 

Theatrical Review: “Potted Potter”

Review of Potted Potter: The Unauthorized Harry Experience / A Dan and Jeff Production
by Russell Nye

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I first heard of Potted Potter: The Unofficial Harry Potter Experience sometime in the late summer of 2012. The show’s premise is performing all seven Harry Potter books in seventy minutes with only two cast members. Was this even a possibility, or was I recalling the amount of page numbers and characters incorrectly when I reflected that there were over 300 characters and 3407 pages? When the performance came to my attention, I was currently re-reading the books, and I thought it to be too obscure of a coincidence to not go out and see the show. The entire premise of the project alone seems too other-worldly to even embark on, and the shock value of that tagline is not to be overlooked—for it is the selling point. The very prospect of all seven Harry Potter books being contained within a seventy minute parameter is un-thinkable for a fan, and so the idea sells.

I was definitely sold. I eventually made plans to go and see it this past December 2012. In the month leading up to going to the show, I built up more anticipation than I needed to and propelled my hopes beyond any level that could ever be lived up to. It is also important to note that my high expectations were due to the intense amount of sentiment which all of the Harry Potter books bear to me, as they do with so many others. Finally, the night of the show came: the curtains were figuratively drawn at the Water Tower Place Theatre, and the performance began. From start to finish, it was nothing but a disappointment.

Instead of trying to create any sort of impressive, or admirable, or even humorous production, the pair of Jeff and Dan decided to keep their show anchored to a street-performance quality (at which the show started in the mid-2000’s and never progressed). The premise of the show is that there are two actors who are there to put on a very expensive, lovely, and fully realized parody of all seven Harry Potter books to the audience, and one of the two jokes which is returned to every-minute of the show is that this is not the case—they do not deliver an expensive, fully developed parody.

Jeff is supposedly the world’s foremost Harry Potter scholar, and in addition to playing Harry for most of the sequences –where they are, in fact, trying to act out the books, and not returning to the same joke which relies on the audience’s, as well as their own recognition that, “wow, they (we) aren’t doing that”– his role throughout the entire show is to express the opinion on behalf of the half of the audience who has in fact read the Harry Potter books. Jeff’s role is lost to the second joke, which is that Dan hasn’t read the books and whose role represents the other non-read half of the audience.

These two jokes are demonstrated throughout the show in this way:
1) Jeff attempts to describe an aspect, or a scene of the Harry Potter series, and then he describes the set, prop, or knowledge of the series that the two of them will need to have to properly perform the scene.
2) Before Jeff can finish his description, Dan interrupts and says the situation is under-control.
3) After some uncomfortable conversation, it is revealed that Dan does not know what to do, which set materials/props to have acquired, how to spend their budget, or very much about Harry Potter at all.
4) At this point Jeff, as well as the audience are face-to-palm in recognition.
5) Once the actors and audience have recognized once again that there is no budget to spend and Dan hasn’t read the books, it is then concluded that they cannot put on the promised production, and they then move on to attempt whatever lesser-means of a performance they could muster.
6) The cycle repeats.

Though, for all of its blunders, the actors must at least be commended of their energy. For the entire duration of the show, the two actors lobby for audience reaction and interaction, eventually culminating —in the only really entertaining bit of the event— in a game of Quidditch. In this game, the front-row audience, which is divided into two subsections (Slytherin vs. Gryphyndor) knocks a beach ball back and forth towards two illuminated neon-rings posted high above the stadium. At the end of the match, Jeff comes out dressed up as a golden snitch, and is slammed into the ground by one of two children called up to the stage to be seekers.

Leading up to this theatrical marvel, Dan continuously runs onto the stage yelling, “Quidditch!” This moment was the only other funny part of the show–which peculiarly also had to do with Quidditch (conclusion: Quidditch is the funniest aspect of Harry Potter). Unfortunately though, this joke too falls victim to bilateral-joke-cycle which was constructed: they return to this yelling of Quidditch continuously because Dan does not know the meaning of Quidditch. Thus, Dan is unable to participate in the athletic competition because he has a vaccum and no broom–even the seemingly hilarious portion of the show was not very funny at all.

Before the show began, one of the two creator-cast members, Dan, ran up and down the aisles, shaking everyone’s hand, and introducing himself. I could have sworn there was a tearful glint in his eyes: perhaps this action was an apology of what was to come.
Note: “Potted Potter” is currently on its U.S. tour; the production has no upcoming performances in Chicago, but can be found in more cities throughout the country. Go to http://www.pottedpotter.com/ for more information on current shows and upcoming tour dates.

About the Writer:
My name is Russell Nye, and I am from Naperville, IL. This is my first year at DePaul. Prospectively, I am an English major, although I’m considering doubling in Philosophy.
Reading the writing of other people and trying my own hand at it have been the preferred methods of entertainment of mine for a fairly long time. Personally, I find writing to be very therapeutic; Nothing clears my head more than writing for no other reason than to write.

Chicago Shakespeare Theater — Winter Internships

Chicago Shakespeare Theater seeking
Interns for Winter 2012/13 Session

Regional Theatre Tony Award recipient Chicago Shakespeare Theater (CST) is seeking qualified and enthusiastic interns for at least a 10-week period between December 2012 and March 2013. CST interns gain invaluable insight and substantive experience in the overarching strategy of their respective departments. In addition to the one-on-one mentoring CST interns receive, they also have access to complimentary tickets to all Chicago Shakespeare performances and free tickets to other Chicago theaters through industry offers. Current students, graduates and early-career professionals are encouraged to apply.

Chicago Shakespeare’s work has been recognized internationally with three of London’s prestigious Laurence Olivier Awards, and by the Chicago theater community with 70 Joseph Jefferson Awards for Artistic Excellence. Under the leadership of Artistic Director Barbara Gaines and Executive Director Criss Henderson, CST is dedicated to producing extraordinary classic productions, new works and family fare; unlocking Shakespeare’s work for educators and students; and serving as Chicago’s cultural ambassador through its World’s Stage Series.

Advancement Internship—Winter 2012/13
Deadline: Friday, November 9, 2012
The Advancement Intern will assist with Chicago Shakespeare Theater’s fundraising initiatives in support of the Theater’s programming. Internship responsibilities may include: assisting in solicitation projects; maintenance of database records; assisting in special events planning and hosting; and researching and maintain donor profiles. View complete listing and application process >

Casting Internship—Winter 2012/13
Deadline: Friday, November 16, 2012
The Casting Intern will assist in every aspect of the casting department, with responsibilities including:organizing casting calls; setting up audition times for actors; arranging audition materials; assisting with auditions preparation and coordination; maintenance of database records; and corresponding with actors and agents regarding auditions. View complete listing and application process >

Education Internship—Winter 2012/13
Deadline: Friday, November 9, 2012
The Education Intern will assist with Chicago Shakespeare Theater’s education programming for students, teachers, and playgoers. Internship responsibilities may include: student matinee preparation and coordination; researching and writing essays; maintenance of database records; and assisting in coordination of Teacher Workshops. View complete listing and application process >

Marketing/PR Internship—Winter 2012/13
Deadline: Friday, November 14 2012
Marketing/PR interns assist with the development and execution of strategic plans to promote CST’s institutional image and attract audiences to plays and related programs produced by the Theater. Internship responsibilities may include: assisting in execution of marketing projects; updating mailing lists; assembling press kits; maintaining photo archives; and conducting research for press releases.View complete listing and application process >

Stage Management Internship—Julius Caesar
Deadline: Friday, November 9 2012
The Stage Management Intern will assist the stage managers during the rehearsal and performances process for the upcoming production of Julius Caesar. Internship responsibilities may include rehearsal space preparation, assisting with floor management, coordinating with other departments, and maintenance of databases, calendars and records. View complete listing and application process >