Upcoming Events: ‘Responding To A Slow-Motion Emergency: Communicating Climate Change’

TONIGHT –

How do you talk about a problem that’s too big to see? How do you demand action when it’s easier to delay? How does art speak in response to science? Come watch a wide-ranging group of artists and professors discuss these questions and more. From DePaul University and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Paola Cabal, Liam Heneghan, Rebecca Johns-Trissler, and Kathryn Schaffer will pool their experience and expertise to help you understand how to grapple with something as daunting—and important—as climate change.

This program is a part of the 2019-2020 One Book, One Chicago season, exploring the theme Season For Change through the book The Sixth Extinction by Elizabeth Kolbert. For more information, visit www.onebookonechicago.org 

 
EVENT DATE & TIME:
Wednesday, January 22, 2020
6:00PM – 7:30PM
 
EVENT LOCATION: 

Rm. 115
DePaul University Richardson Library

Visiting Writer: Allison Joseph

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Please join the DePaul Department of English as we welcome poet and editor Allison Joseph to the Visiting Writers Program on

Thursday, October 5 @ 6 PM
Richardson Library 115
2350 N Kenmore Avenue

Joseph, director of the Southern Illinois University MFA Program in Creative Writing, is the author of What Keeps Us Here (Ampersand, 1992), Soul Train (Carnegie Mellon, 1997), In Every Seam (Pittsburgh, 1997), Imitation of Life (Carnegie Mellon, 2003) and Worldly Pleasures (Word Press, 2004). Her honors include the John C. Zacharis First Book Prize, fellowships from the Bread Loaf and Sewanee Writers Conferences, and an Illinois Arts Council Fellowship in Poetry. She is editor and poetry editor of Crab Orchard Review and director of the Young Writers Workshop, an annual summer residential creative writing workshop for high school writers, and holds the Judge Williams Holmes Cook Endowed Professorship.

Event Spotlight: Visiting Writers Kathleen Rooney, Martin Seay

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by Robert M. Keding
contributor to the Underground

Packed in to a small meeting room in DePaul’s Richardson Library, a large audience gathered to hear authors Kathleen Rooney and Martin Seay read selections from their newest novels, and then answer questions on their creative processes and experiences within the literary world.

Martin Seay’s book is entitled The Mirror Thief, and follows three different con artists working in sixteenth-century Venice, 1950s Venice Beach, California, and modern-day Las Vegas in the Venice Casino. This bold debut novel, weaving together these three seemingly separate but mysteriously linked narratives, is a masterfully written tale, evoking comparisons to such work as Cloud Atlas.

Seay’s advice to aspiring writers is to do a lot of background research, especially for period pieces like The Mirror Thief. “Even if you have the facts and details right, you still have to make sure the dialogue flows correctly too. Otherwise you might just end up with characters that sound like the people faking British accents on the subway,” he told the crowd. To get the sixteenth-century portions of the story sounding right, he found himself reading a lot of literature of that time—especially Shakespeare.

Kathleen Rooney spoke about her recent novel, Lillian Boxfish Takes a Walk. This is her second novel, and was just published by St. Martin’s Press in the first weeks of 2017. The story chronicles an aging Lillian, going for a stroll around New York City and recounting various moments during her life, from humble beginnings to a career as the highest-paid woman in American advertising.

Rooney’s advice touched on the differences between writing prose and poetry, another realm of literature which she is invested in. “It’s possible to accidentally sit down and write a great poem. It’s a task so durationally shorter and full of so many chances for happy mistakes… It is, however, much more difficult to sit down for an hour or two and come up saying, ‘Whoops, I just accidentally wrote a really well-crafted novel!’” The room, undoubtedly filled with aspiring writers, could certainly relate.

Be sure to look for The Mirror Thief and Lillian Boxfish Takes a Walk, in bookstores now.