ENG Fun: First Annual Campus Gnome Hunt

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DePaul’s Student Orgs’ Inaugural Gnome Hunt 2018 will take place February 5-9.  Student Organizations and DePaul offices have adopted gnomes they’ve decorated and named.  These gnomes are hidden around the Lincoln Park and Loop campuses during the week of the Gnome Hunt.  Students who find a gnome can bring it to the Office of Student Involvement to receive DePaul swag and a Chartwells gift card.

Swing by the English offices in Arts and Letters Hall on Wednesday this week to see if you can find the English Department’s gnome, Gnomeo (…Gnome-eo, Gnome-eo.  Wherefore art, thou, Gnome-eo?).

And, keep your eyes peeled to our social media sites for hints about Gnomeo’s whereabouts…

Happy Hunting!

ENG Advising: Spring Enrollment Begins Feb. 8

English majors: spring and summer registration begins on February 8.  Most seniors will enroll on the 8th; then enrollment dates and times will open for juniors, sophomores, and freshmen throughout the following week in order of descending credit hours earned.  To view your specific enrollment date and time, please check your Student Center (https://offices.depaul.edu/depaul-central/student-resources/learning-center/Pages/student-center.aspx) in CampusConnect.

View Spring course descriptions.

If you need advice before or during registration, you may rely on your English Faculty Advisors or James Phelps.  Instructions for how to schedule a meeting with Mr. Phelps are in the infographic below (click on it for full instructions).

advisor instructions

Event Review: Gothic and Horror Fiction Open Mic Night

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Hannah Cantafio reads at the Gothic & Horror Open Mic Night.

by Taylor Spies, contributor to the Underground

The Gamma Psi Chapter of Sigma Tau Delta, the National honor society for students majoring in English, held a Gothic and Horror Fiction Open Mic Night on the third floor of Arts and Letters Hall on Monday, October 30th at 6pm. The event was small, but the intimate environment was perfect for ghost stories.

Chapter President Bintou Sy began by greeting those that had gathered and introducing Associate Professor and Director of the Undergraduate Program, Jennifer Conary. Conary gave an overview of the origins of the gothic novel and how we interpret the genre today. It was easy to tell that Conary was passionate about her topic, and her warm voice invited the audience to become intrigued by the gothic, stating, “Gothic novels offer physical manifestations of psychological horrors or fears.”

The first reader, Hannah Cantafio, read a short story from the novel Haunted by Chuck Palahniuk, published in 2005. “Dog Years” follows a rich and mysterious wheelchair-bound man. Her words came quick and clear, painting the picture the author created.

The next reader was Assistant Director of Graduate Programs, Janet L. Hickey. Hickey read from The Book of Irish Weirdness by Mairtin O’Griofa, published in 1997. The book showcases short stories by well-known authors. Hickey read “The Judge’s House” by Bram Stoker. This was quite a step back in time as the story was originally published in 1891. However, the story had gotten no less eerie with age, and, followed a student renting out a house rumored to be haunted.

Assistant Professor Bill Johnson González read the next piece, a chapter from The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros, published in 1984, titled “Geraldo No Last Name.” This piece varied strikingly from the traditional Gothic. González expressed his attempt to find a piece of gothic writing by someone with a Latino or Hispanic background.

Associate Professor and Chair Michele Morano gave the final reading. She read excerpts from a short story by William Faulkner, published in 1930, titled “A Rose for Emily.” This story follows an eccentric lady whose behavior grows increasingly odd as she ages. She never marries, refuses to pay taxes, and dies in the same old house she was born in. It isn’t until after she has been buried that her house is investigated and the truth about her past comes out. The story’s shocking conclusion was the perfect ending to the night. The stories read drew the audience in. One became aware of Halloween’s approach, the dead leaves swirling outside, and the quickly growing darkness.